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#7218836 - 12/23/12 09:00 AM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Notropis]
35WhelenNut Offline
Member

Registered: 10/08/06
Posts: 218
Loc: North Texas
Originally Posted By: Notropis
I just picked up a Uberti 1873 in 44/40 for Cowboy shooting. What parts or modifications should I consider to make the rifle slick and fast? Can I do most of it myself or would it be better to let a pro deal with it?


I'm new to CAS so not an expert on any level. That said, I bought a used 1873 in .44 Special. I love tinkering with guns so it never entered my mind to send it off for work. I ordered a short stroke kit from Pioneer Gun works and installed it myself. The work really isn't difficult at all, but fitting is a little tedious in that disassembly/reassembly is required. The kit included good instructions.
As far as slicking it up, shoot the gun for a while then disassemble it and using oiled 400 wet/dry sandpaper, polish the parts that rub each other. There's a lot that can be done with regards to lightening springs, but it's too much to detail here. If you're not comfortable figuring it out on your own, there are instructional videos available.

35WN
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"Only accurate rifles are interesting."- Col. Townsend Whelen
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#7235923 - 12/28/12 06:53 AM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: 35WhelenNut]
Dirtfarmer Offline
Campfire 'Bwana

Registered: 11/28/10
Posts: 11389
Loc: Central Louisiana
WN,

Glad you had a good experience. Many have tried that, got the parts in and found that it was hard to lever, or had some other quirk. Changing the geometry can have unexpected results. I work on gun a lot, but didn't wish to tackle the '73. The guys that do this all the time have it worked out.

I have two '73's, one a full house carbine by Pioneer with their special carbine band front sight. The other is a short rifle by Cody Conagher, both with short strokes. Cody welds his own, probably using a jig, whereas Pioneer has an in house made CNC machined kit that they use. To me, the Pioneer gun isn't as loose as the Cody gun and it's the one I use. They're both slick and fast.

Most CAS shooters evolve to the .38 Spec. after starting with larger calibers. The only reason I can think of for using over .40 rounds is the classes that call for the larger caliber. And I don't shoot is those classes.

The '73 is COAL critical due to its design. To gain the .357 COAL, using .38 Spec brass, I use Moulton Lead, 147 gr. bullets. They are long and when seated in a .38 Spec. case, result in a .357 COAL. Most '73's will cycle a .38 Spec, but work better, IMHO, with a .357 COAL. The shorter round has to be cammed back into the mag tube as the gun cycles. Less camming, slicker the stroke.

DF


Edited by Dirtfarmer (12/28/12 06:54 AM)

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#7236553 - 12/28/12 10:01 AM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Dirtfarmer]
35WhelenNut Offline
Member

Registered: 10/08/06
Posts: 218
Loc: North Texas
Originally Posted By: Dirtfarmer
WN,

Glad you had a good experience. Many have tried that, got the parts in and found that it was hard to lever, or had some other quirk. Changing the geometry can have unexpected results. I work on gun a lot, but didn't wish to tackle the '73. The guys that do this all the time have it worked out.

I have two '73's, one a full house carbine by Pioneer with their special carbine band front sight. The other is a short rifle by Cody Conagher, both with short strokes. Cody welds his own, probably using a jig, whereas Pioneer has an in house made CNC machined kit that they use. To me, the Pioneer gun isn't as loose as the Cody gun and it's the one I use. They're both slick and fast.

Most CAS shooters evolve to the .38 Spec. after starting with larger calibers. The only reason I can think of for using over .40 rounds is the classes that call for the larger caliber. And I don't shoot is those classes.

The '73 is COAL critical due to its design. To gain the .357 COAL, using .38 Spec brass, I use Moulton Lead, 147 gr. bullets. They are long and when seated in a .38 Spec. case, result in a .357 COAL. Most '73's will cycle a .38 Spec, but work better, IMHO, with a .357 COAL. The shorter round has to be cammed back into the mag tube as the gun cycles. Less camming, slicker the stroke.

DF


Mine levered a little hard at first, but after firing a couple of matches, it's really slicked up. In fact with the heavy brass carrier block, when closing the lever, it feels almost like it's closing itself. Now that I've done one of the short stroke kits, it should be an easier task in the future.

I've been told many times by other competitors that .38s are "better" for competition and that there's no need in using larger calibers, but guns to me are tools and I don't like the idea of owning firearms that are only used for competition. I chose the .44 Special in part because the cartridge intrigues me, but mainly because properly handloaded it will do a great job in the hunting field.

I haven't had any issues so far with c.o.a.l. When I first started using the 44 Sp, the only bullet mould I owned cast a 250 gr. Keith SWC, so I made do with it. The rifle fed it just fine a fast as I cared to lever them through. Since then, I ordered a custom mould that drops a 170 gr. RNFP. It's somewhat shorter than the 250 gr. SWC, but no feeding issues so far.

35WN
_________________________
"Only accurate rifles are interesting."- Col. Townsend Whelen
"I always tell the truth....that way, I don't have to remember anything."- George Burns
NRA Life Member
Certified NRA Reloading Instructor
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#7281142 - 01/07/13 01:34 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: 35WhelenNut]
Old_Writer Offline
Campfire Regular

Registered: 01/27/11
Posts: 553
Loc: Shenandoah Valley
About a year ago I sold all of my CAS guns, a brace of .44 revolvers and a matching .44 carbine, and replaced them with .38/.357 shootin' irons. My cost to shoot has come waaay down (I don't reload) and out to about 75-100 yards the .357 magnum is adequate for deer, which seems to be the more or less effective range of a .44 special, as well. Even if I hand loaded I don't think I'd go back to anything larger for CAS, and if I felt the need for something bigger in the hunting field, I'd take a different gun.


Edited by Old_Writer (01/07/13 01:38 PM)
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#7281223 - 01/07/13 01:48 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Old_Writer]
Dirtfarmer Offline
Campfire 'Bwana

Registered: 11/28/10
Posts: 11389
Loc: Central Louisiana
O.W.,

That's a common and very typical story; shows the evolution of a CAS shooter from beginner to seasoned CAS hand. Unless one is in a CAS classification specifying .40 cal.+, the .38 Spec. is THE most efficient, least expensive ultimate choice.

DF

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#7281514 - 01/07/13 02:46 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Old_Writer]
35WhelenNut Offline
Member

Registered: 10/08/06
Posts: 218
Loc: North Texas
Originally Posted By: Old_Writer
About a year ago I sold all of my CAS guns, a brace of .44 revolvers and a matching .44 carbine, and replaced them with .38/.357 shootin' irons. My cost to shoot has come waaay down (I don't reload) and out to about 75-100 yards the .357 magnum is adequate for deer, which seems to be the more or less effective range of a .44 special, as well. Even if I hand loaded I don't think I'd go back to anything larger for CAS, and if I felt the need for something bigger in the hunting field, I'd take a different gun.


You shoot CAS and DON'T reload?!?!? eek No wonder you switched to .38's!! Even at that, the least expensive .38 ammo I've seen was almost $20 per 50. I can handload .44's for for less than $2 a box...MUCH less as the brass pays for itself.

I don't quite agree with your comparison of the .357 and .44 in the field. My wifes .357 Rossi stays in the gun rack in the laundry room with the other "utility" rifles where it's convenient to grab on the way out the door, but when I head out to feed the calves or just piddle in the pasture, etc. I'll grab the .44 everytime knowing that bigger is always better!

35WN
_________________________
"Only accurate rifles are interesting."- Col. Townsend Whelen
"I always tell the truth....that way, I don't have to remember anything."- George Burns
NRA Life Member
Certified NRA Reloading Instructor
Certified Texas Hunter Education Instructor

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#7282289 - 01/07/13 05:12 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: 35WhelenNut]
Dirtfarmer Offline
Campfire 'Bwana

Registered: 11/28/10
Posts: 11389
Loc: Central Louisiana
If I was out to feed calves, I'd choose a .44 over a .357.

CAS is just a game and the lighter round is the preferred way to go, based on many collective years of shooting experience.

Whacking a 'yote or other calf unfriendly varmint, the .44 would be better, for sure.

(I'd probably take my .22-204, Model 7, and leave the .44 at home.)

DF

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#7287759 - 01/08/13 07:55 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Dirtfarmer]
Notropis Offline
Campfire Guide

Registered: 04/16/08
Posts: 2884
Loc: Coastal N.C.
38 Special certainly does seem to dominate among the top shooters I have seen. I am rigged up to shoot 38 Specials in both revolvers and a rifle and use them often. I am also rigged up with revolvers and rifles to compete with 44/40, 44 Rem Mag, 45 Colt, and 22 for the youngsters. I got the Uberti in 44/40 because my old M92 in 44/40 sometimes has a little problem feeding and I wanted to be able to use it in Wild Bunch matches. We have a match this weekend, and I will probably break out the 38 Specials.

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#7287907 - 01/08/13 08:35 PM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: Notropis]
35WhelenNut Offline
Member

Registered: 10/08/06
Posts: 218
Loc: North Texas
Forgot to mention...when the wife and I started CAS last August, I bought a pair of Uberti Hombre's in .357 and a Rossi as well. I worked all three over internally so they all function very smoothly. I shot a few matches with them and they worked great, but like I said, the .44 Special holds a certain amount of intrigue to me. Now the wife uses the .357's.


Yes sirm Dirt, were I going out specifically for coyotes, either my .223 or my 220 Swift would be my first choice. But the .44 just seems at home in the front seat of my little beat up Nissan pick up. And, I don't panic when my 2 year old granddaughter traipses across it with her little muddy boots like I would if it were one ofmy scoped rifles.

35WN
_________________________
"Only accurate rifles are interesting."- Col. Townsend Whelen
"I always tell the truth....that way, I don't have to remember anything."- George Burns
NRA Life Member
Certified NRA Reloading Instructor
Certified Texas Hunter Education Instructor

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#7288911 - 01/09/13 07:15 AM Re: Uberti 1973 [Re: 35WhelenNut]
Dirtfarmer Offline
Campfire 'Bwana

Registered: 11/28/10
Posts: 11389
Loc: Central Louisiana
Originally Posted By: 35WhelenNut
And, I don't panic when my 2 year old granddaughter traipses across it with her little muddy boots like I would if it were one of my scoped rifles. 35WN

Can just see that... smile

Agree... laugh

Sounds like you guys are having a blast... cool

DF

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