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The .338-.375 Campfire:
Part One

 Rick Bin

Revolvers Make Riflemen
 Ken Howell

A Campfire Review of 8x42 Binoculars
 Rick Bin

A New Way to Hunt Lion
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

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Where Giants Walk The Earth
 Rick Bin

Annealing Cases
 Ken Howell

Jaguars In California
 James Capen Adams

Those Other North American Bears
 Laban Fieldman

Killer Buffalo
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

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BIG EYES
Seeing Is Believing

 Rick Bin

Your Chronograph Can Tell You More
 Ken Howell

Africa And Actions
 John Buhmiller

On Seeing Deer
 Stewart Edward White
 [1873-1946]

Shootout With The Black-and-White Cat
 Steve Timm

Swiggett Kills A Killer
 Ken Howell

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Handloading for Long-Range Shooting
 John Haviland

Three Types of Hunters/
The Five Stages of a Sport Hunter

 Denny L. Vasquez

Big Ivory
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

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Gnawed and Clawed
 Ken Howell

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Move Over Fail Safe
Winchester's New XP3
Big-Game Bullet

 John Haviland

Factors In Accuracy Part Two: Handloads
 John Barsness

My Love Affair with Grace
 Charles Speck

How I Killed a Bear
 Charles Dudley Warner

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Best Buys In Binoculars
 John Barsness

Bear In Camp!
 Ken Howell

Last Minute Muley
 Rick Bin

Factors In Accuracy
Part One: Rifles And Shooting

 John Barsness

A Brownie Got Me
 Ken Howell

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The .300 Winchester
 Jack Steele

Looking Long
 John Barsness

Choose the Right Backcountry Tent
 Rick Bin

Who Bombed Elmer Keith?
 Ken Howell

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Salty Locals
 Frank Nuni

El Tigre, Jr.
 Ken Howell

     
 
 
 
 
 
 
Best Buys In Binoculars
Continued from Page 1

The 8x43 Pentax is a good, solid hunting binocular that John has used all over the world. In addition, the global marketplace has ensured that virtually nothing is made in one factory, or even one country.  I've already mentioned that some Japanese vehicles are made in the U.S.  Well, some of the parts in those vehicles might be made in Mexico, China or Portugal.  The same thing occurs in optics.  Once it becomes too expensive to manufacture any product in one factory, companies find out where else it can be made for less money.  This is why some top "European" optics are now assembled from parts made all over the world.  The popular Zeiss Conquest line of riflescopes, for instance, only includes one major component (the erector assembly) made in Germany.  The rest are made in the Czech Republic, including the glass - and final assembly is done in the U.S.  One "American" scope, the Burris Fullfield II, is made in the Philippines - on machines designed and built in the U.S., by workers trained and supervised by U.S. workers.

A pair of good 8x32's in the $300 class as the Bushnell Legend and Leupold Katmai. The reason for all this is simple: Zeiss Conquests and Burris Fullfield II’s could not be made at competitive prices in Germany or the U.S.  Are they inferior products?  No — or at least that is the consensus of vast numbers of satisfied customers.  So we have to throw some prejudices out the window when evaluating optics, and get with the 21st century.

Unlike riflescopes, binoculars are strictly designed to help us see.  While they should also be rugged enough to last a long time, no binocular is indestructible, and even the toughest in the world are useless if they don’t help us perceive detail.  And detail is the binocular bottom line.

When it comes to binoculars, detail is the bottom line! While magnification is important, it can be proven that a good 8x42 transmits more detail to our eyes than a good 10x32.  This is because sharpness (known to optical engineers as “resolution”) is not just a matter of magnification, but several factors, one the relative size of the objective lens.  A larger objective (front lens) allows more light to go where its directed, so we end up seeing more detail through an 8x42 than through a 10x32, everything else being equal.





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