SMOKELORE
MAGAZINE


 
Editor's Desk

 
 

__________________

The .338-.375 Campfire:
Part One

 Rick Bin

Revolvers Make Riflemen
 Ken Howell

A Campfire Review of 8x42 Binoculars
 Rick Bin

A New Way to Hunt Lion
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

__________________

Where Giants Walk The Earth
 Rick Bin

Annealing Cases
 Ken Howell

Jaguars In California
 James Capen Adams

Those Other North American Bears
 Laban Fieldman

Killer Buffalo
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

__________________

BIG EYES
Seeing Is Believing

 Rick Bin

Your Chronograph Can Tell You More
 Ken Howell

Africa And Actions
 John Buhmiller

On Seeing Deer
 Stewart Edward White
 [1873-1946]

Shootout With The Black-and-White Cat
 Steve Timm

Swiggett Kills A Killer
 Ken Howell

__________________

Handloading for Long-Range Shooting
 John Haviland

Three Types of Hunters/
The Five Stages of a Sport Hunter

 Denny L. Vasquez

Big Ivory
 Ken Howell
(as told by Elgin Gates)

__________________

Gnawed and Clawed
 Ken Howell

__________________

Move Over Fail Safe
Winchester's New XP3
Big-Game Bullet

 John Haviland

Factors In Accuracy Part Two: Handloads
 John Barsness

My Love Affair with Grace
 Charles Speck

How I Killed a Bear
 Charles Dudley Warner

__________________

Best Buys In Binoculars
 John Barsness

Bear In Camp!
 Ken Howell

Last Minute Muley
 Rick Bin

Factors In Accuracy
Part One: Rifles And Shooting

 John Barsness

A Brownie Got Me
 Ken Howell

__________________

The .300 Winchester
 Jack Steele

Looking Long
 John Barsness

Choose the Right Backcountry Tent
 Rick Bin

Who Bombed Elmer Keith?
 Ken Howell

__________________

Salty Locals
 Frank Nuni

El Tigre, Jr.
 Ken Howell

     
 
 
 
 
 
 
Best Buys In Binoculars
Continued from Page 3

You need at least a 4mm exit pupil to see well in dim light. A minimum of a 4mm exit pupil is needed to see reasonable detail in dim light.  (It does no good to magnify something 10 times if the image just looks like a larger mystery-blob.)  We can figure out the exit pupil’s size by dividing the objective lens diameter by the magnification.  An 8x32 binocular, for instance, has the minimum 4mm exit pupil, while a 10x32 does not — one reason I regard even the best 10x32’s in the world as a poor choice for most hunting, even though most binocular manufacturers report 10x as the top seller all across the board.  The tiny exit pupil of the 10x32 also makes long-term glassing uncomfortable, since our eyes are essentially locked into one position: staring straight ahead.  Just as it’s much more comfortable to walk rather than stand in place for 20 minutes, it’s much more comfortable to glass through a larger exit pupil, allowing our eyes to roam around a little.

Eventually we had 30-some binoculars arrayed on the living room couch, next to the big picture window that looks out across the street.  Our friends showed up late in the afternoon on a dark, cloudy day, ideal for really testing binoculars.  The view through many binoculars looks OK on sunny days, because the pupils of our eyes “stop down” to tiny dots, much like the aperture that sets the f-stop in a camera.  The big reason for this eye-reaction is to keep too much bright light out of our eyes, but a secondary effect is to sharpen the view.  

Eileen Clarke used a 10x43 Pentax DCF SP when glassing for open-country elk in southwestern Montana. The smaller pupils in our eyes cut down stray light at the edges of our eyes, and stray light (rays that don’t all arrive at the same place) is one major reason for a fuzzy view, whether through our eyes or through binoculars.  When our eyes “stop down” in bright light, they make even cheap binoculars look pretty good.  So to truly test binoculars, we should look through them in dim light, when our pupils open up and allow all the defects of a binocular’s optics to show up.  

The binoculars ranged in magnification from 8x to 10x, with objective lenses from 32mm to 44mm.  All were roof-prism models.  Why?  Because roof-prism binoculars are tougher, more compact and easier to waterproof than Porro-prism binoculars, the reason roofs have just about taken over the serious hunting market in the past decade.  

Continue


 
 


 

Visit Our Sponsors
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 



Copyright © 2000-2007 24hourcampfire.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.