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#12011974 - 05/03/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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The backstraps are to die for. Best wild game I've ever had. I shot four of them and every one was that good.

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#12011978 - 05/03/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: TomM1]  
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Originally Posted by TomM1
Originally Posted by Bighorn
Properly cared for, antelope meat is some of the best wild game there is. So good, in fact, that I just cut them up myself! Not hard to do, but the key to good antelope meat begins when they hit the ground. I gut and skin immediately, and get the carcass cooled down as quickly as possible.
No mystery to cutting them up- remove the backstraps and tenderloins, then the quarters. Simply separate the major muscles, and cut them up into steaks. With the front quarters, sometimes I will save a couple of roasts, but usually just cut this meat into steaks as well. Scraps are saved for cooking chicken-fried or for treats for the dog. Burger is a waste of time. Double-wrap in freezer bags or paper, and prepare to enjoy some very tasty eating!

If you are a fan of sausage, then a processor is probably your best bet- I have gone that route in the past, with mixed results. The problem with doing processed meats, IMO, is they are usually 'batched'- meat from a lot of other animals are added to the mix, with unknown care and meat condition.


Why is the burger a waste of time? Too lean Im guessing? Gotta atleast be good for chilli, etc.

Also, for those who hunt Antelope but live east of the mississippi, how do you get your meat home? Ship it? Im looking at a 3-4 day drive in 2018 season.



I loved Antelope burger! I packed my Pronghorn meat in dry ice to get it home.

#12012451 - 05/03/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: moosemike]  
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Guts out and hide off on the first bounce, then into the 150quart cooler on ice!

Pronghorn hair has a pungent "lanolin" inside it, and if you cut the hair it leaves the oil on your knife. For the last 57 years hunting them I have carried plenty of water and wipes to keep my knife clean.

The best cuts are the backstrap and round steaks, IMO. Don't grind them, and use the good meat as the treasure it is. The rest makes great jerky.

Have a GREAT hunt, and post pictures this fall. wink

Last edited by luv2safari; 05/03/17.

Hunt with Class and Classics


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...and...now...goodbye
#12016825 - 05/06/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Don't let it get hot and don't let it get waterlogged and it is delicious. I keep the plug out of the ice chest if I have enough ice and other than time in the ice chest don't age it at all. I only grind up the scraps as the other cuts are so good. Add bacon tips at about 10-15% for instant bacon burgers. The neck is good for pot roast or chili. Mixed some with Javelina for Pozole and I thought I had ruined it but turned out great after slow cooking.


"When you disarm the people, you commence to offend them and show that you distrust them either through cowardice or lack of confidence, and both of these opinions generate hatred." Niccolo Machiavelli
#12017161 - 05/06/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Rock Chuck Offline
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For you newbies to antelope...if you plan to keep the hide, be VERY careful with it. You can pull out the hair in handfuls. They're very weakly attached. It doesn't take any dragging at all to ruin the appearance.


You can't fix stupid...
but you can numb it a bit with a 2x4
#12017216 - 05/06/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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DryPowder Offline
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Originally Posted by Reloder28
Originally Posted by Ole_270
......really look forward to the eating, not just the hunt.


Looking forward to both also. I gave up on annual hunting leases in 2010. Decided to do paid hunts. This'll be my first venture beyond Axis in the Hill Country.




It's would be very interesting to hear your thoughts if you don't mind. Pros/Cons etc.

Last edited by DryPowder; 05/06/17.
#12017346 - 05/06/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Bighorn]  
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Originally Posted by Bighorn
Properly cared for, antelope meat is some of the best wild game there is. So good, in fact, that I just cut them up myself! Not hard to do, but the key to good antelope meat begins when they hit the ground. I gut and skin immediately, and get the carcass cooled down as quickly as possible.
No mystery to cutting them up- remove the backstraps and tenderloins, then the quarters. Simply separate the major muscles, and cut them up into steaks. With the front quarters, sometimes I will save a couple of roasts, but usually just cut this meat into steaks as well. Scraps are saved for cooking chicken-fried or for treats for the dog. Burger is a waste of time. Double-wrap in freezer bags or paper, and prepare to enjoy some very tasty eating!

If you are a fan of sausage, then a processor is probably your best bet- I have gone that route in the past, with mixed results. The problem with doing processed meats, IMO, is they are usually 'batched'- meat from a lot of other animals are added to the mix, with unknown care and meat condition.

Best game meat I've eaten to date. I prefer it over elk. I agree with everything Bighorn said, process it yourself. Antelope is not a big animal and you'll know you're getting your meat back and nothing else.

#12018093 - 05/06/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: DryPowder]  
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Reloder28 Offline
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Originally Posted by DryPowder
Originally Posted by Reloder28
Originally Posted by Ole_270
......really look forward to the eating, not just the hunt.


Looking forward to both also. I gave up on annual hunting leases in 2010. Decided to do paid hunts. This'll be my first venture beyond Axis in the Hill Country.




It's would be very interesting to hear your thoughts if you don't mind. Pros/Cons etc.


What part of that would you like me to expound upon? The giving up on the leases?


"We are Texas Rangers. Our jurisdiction is wherever we happen to be. Understood?"
Augustus McRae
#12024030 - 05/09/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Everyone n my extended family agrees antelope is better than elk and much better than deer.

When we get an antelope down (usually in WY), we gut it immediately and skin it as soon as we get it to the truck, where we have a portable skinning rack. Then it goes in a cooler with ice. We keep it on ice until until we get it to Steve's Meat Market in Arvada, CO. We keep the backstraps, filets and hams and burger or sausage the rest.


Coyote Hunter - NRA Endowment Life, NRA Whittington Center Life, GOA, DAD - and I VOTE!

No, I'm not a Ruger bigot - just an unabashed fan of their revolvers, M77's and #1's.
#12024143 - 05/09/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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I hated antelope for years because my step dad never knew how to process it. We'd always turn it into sausage and pepperoni because it was so gamey. But then a buddy of mine showed me how to get it cooled down FAST. It's like eating lamb -- tender, flavorful - awesome. lso -- don't shoot one that's running.



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#12024401 - 05/10/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Rock Chuck Offline
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Years ago, my partner and I both got opening day antelope. His was mid-morning and we skinned it and put it coolers with ice. Mine was just before dark. It had cooled down to about 40 so we just dressed it and put it in the back of my Wagoneer for the 40 mile trip home. The meat was fine, but...I have this problem with sagebrush pollen. Having the pollen saturated hide right behind me for an hour caused my sinuses and eyes to go ballistic. It took me 3 days to get over that 1 hour trip home.


You can't fix stupid...
but you can numb it a bit with a 2x4
#12024463 - 05/10/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Rock Chuck]  
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Originally Posted by Rock Chuck
Years ago, my partner and I both got opening day antelope. His was mid-morning and we skinned it and put it coolers with ice. Mine was just before dark. It had cooled down to about 40 so we just dressed it and put it in the back of my Wagoneer for the 40 mile trip home. The meat was fine, but...I have this problem with sagebrush pollen. Having the pollen saturated hide right behind me for an hour caused my sinuses and eyes to go ballistic. It took me 3 days to get over that 1 hour trip home.


My allergy is tumble weeds. Dove hunts kick a$$ for me.Even the early October antelope hunts are tough

I prefer the December doe hunts . Easier to cool the meat down fast. Have to watch though as bucks have mostly shed their horn sheaths by then. I am working on bag of antelope round steaks this week for dinners


If God wanted you to walk and carry things on your back, He would not have invented stirrups and pack saddles
#12024898 - 05/10/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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1minute Offline
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Steak as much as possible. In my book, the absolute best of all north American game.


1Minute
#12026010 - 05/11/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Snake River Marksman]  
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Originally Posted by Snake River Marksman

[Linked Image]


Handy set up right there!


Can't beat a good turkey hunt...
#12033707 - 05/15/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Reloader28: Cool your Antelope immediately by skinning and packing the carcass with an ice block for transportation - this will IMPROVE the taste of what ever cuts you decide on.
I make all steaks from all the cuts I can and everything else is made into Antelope hamburger (by adding some beef suet and small amounts of other meats) - this hamburger makes excellent chilli, tacos, burritos etc.
Good luck this fall.
Hold into the wind
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#12038186 - 05/17/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Shoot one that has been alfalfa or wheat stubble all late summer/fall. Great eating!

Sagebrush bucks, not so much.

#12038368 - 05/17/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Maybe I have lucky but even the ones that were a long ways from alfalfa and clearly living in sagebrush tasted great to me. The buck I shot last year was feeding in a grass pasture and was also great but I didn't notice much difference in quality among any of them. As others have said-I was warned to get them dressed and cooled quickly and I took that advice seriously.

#12038531 - 05/17/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Rock Chuck Offline
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Their summer diet is mainly grass if they have it. In the winter, they eat sagebrush. I don't think I'd want to eat one that's been on a sage diet.


You can't fix stupid...
but you can numb it a bit with a 2x4
#12040235 - 05/18/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Originally Posted by Reloder28
Originally Posted by DryPowder
Originally Posted by Reloder28
Originally Posted by Ole_270
......really look forward to the eating, not just the hunt.


Looking forward to both also. I gave up on annual hunting leases in 2010. Decided to do paid hunts. This'll be my first venture beyond Axis in the Hill Country.




It's would be very interesting to hear your thoughts if you don't mind. Pros/Cons etc.


What part of that would you like me to expound upon? The giving up on the leases?



Just the value of the lease in quality of hunting vs doing paid hunts. Like dollars spent per year vs animals harvested and days in the field, quality of the hunts etc. Was there any BS that went along with the lease that you eliminated? Obviously the paid hunts are working good for you and the variety would be a pretty big plus.

#12042844 - 05/19/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Reloder28 Offline
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In Texas, it is easier to find a Telephone Booth than a lease of much promise to hunt on. Nearly every lease has a "quality management program", meaning you'll never see anything better than a 120 if you're lucky. Owners are after the money & really have no concern for your success even though they charge you $2500 or more annually. High fence leases must feed their animals gold dust for the prices they charge. True trophy leases cost a 401K or an IRA. There is constant argument that the indigenous animals belong to the people of Texas, yet most of them are stacked up behind high fences. It is illegal to own Whitetails in Texas unless you have paid the right money to the right people. Once you find a lease you spend money, time & labor in an attempt to prepare your hunting area. Later, the owner decide you don't fit into his "Good Ole Boys Club" and does not extend your spot for the next season. So, you improve his property & get nothing in return. I once had a lease boss who offered my camping spot to his buddy and they moved my trailer out of their way. Had they asked me to move it I would have done so without issue. Went to the lease to hunt, arrived after dark and had no idea where my trailer was. It wasn't where I left it.


Paid hunts offer variety as you mentioned. They are readily available. You can get into them for as little or as much as you care to pay. Paid hunts do not require me to haul a flotilla of travel trailers, blinds, feeders, ATV's & other related equipment hundreds of miles across the state only to have to haul it all back the next season. Feeding costs. Protein costs. If your lease is in deep East Texas, the safety of your equipment is suspect at best. If you are on a lease you can go hunt as often as you please. If you do that on paid hunts you can run out of funds quickly. Paid hunts are hospitable, trustworthy & cordial if you get with the right folks.


"We are Texas Rangers. Our jurisdiction is wherever we happen to be. Understood?"
Augustus McRae
#12043106 - 05/19/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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DryPowder Offline
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Thanks for the reply. I figured there was a story in there somewhere. I've always had a place to hunt when I wanted to go. This public land deal looks interesting. I can't wait to get some experience. I had the chance to go over 20 years ago with a friend who was pretty successful at it. I wish now I would have.

#12043916 - 05/20/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: Reloder28]  
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Here's a photo of Daughter #1 with one of our 2016 antelope. The cooler she is standing on is one of four large coolers we took. Doe antelope fold up nicely inside, We fill two with bags of ice. The skinning rack consists of two 1"x1" square tube, 4 bolts/lock washers/nuts, some black pipe/elbows/nipples/etc. and a 2x4. Goes up and comes down in seconds. We gut them on the ground, skin them and ice them down. Awesome eating.

[Linked Image]


Coyote Hunter - NRA Endowment Life, NRA Whittington Center Life, GOA, DAD - and I VOTE!

No, I'm not a Ruger bigot - just an unabashed fan of their revolvers, M77's and #1's.
#12044336 - 05/20/17 Re: Antelope processing [Re: DakotaDeer]  
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Originally Posted by DakotaDeer
Shoot one that has been alfalfa or wheat stubble all late summer/fall. Great eating!

Sagebrush bucks, not so much.


Sounds great. Try to find some alfalfa where I hunt.


DIY. Fair chase. NRA life member.
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