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#12095261 - 06/16/17 Cost of Freedom  
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skitish Offline
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skitish  Offline
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To date they say one million men and women have given their lives in the defense of our country and our freedoms. While this is a huge price it does not reflect the total cost of our freedom. To this we must add the lost futures and the devastated families. We must add the children that are forced to grow up without father or mother. We must add to the tally the men and women that returned broken in body and spirit and left to fend for themselves as they dealt with their physical challenges and demons. Add to the costs their time and anxiety as they try to find jobs to support their families in a market place and society they do not understand and does not understand them. Add to the costs the thousand tears the mothers and fathers shed when the stranger in the military uniform knocks at their door bearing a letter and the scars they bear forever in their loss. Do not misunderstand, I do not begrudge my service nor do I think many others do. We went knowing the price that might be paid and for a variety of reasons. If our Country was in peril we would go again. Many of us believe we are better for our service. Many of us know it had to be done. Just remember that when you see the young service man and he is standing tall and clean with all his parts still attached, there are many others with the thousand yard stare, haunted by their demons and broken in body. These are not so clean and not so strong but they gave their all for what they thought was right and now they just do the best they can. These men and women are still paying for our freedom. These men and women also deserve our help and respect. If you’re a vet and you’re doing ok, thank God. If you’re a civilian thank a vet, if you have the opportunity to help a vet whether with a job or your vote, think about the cost of your freedom.

CMG 300 BP

#12108595 - 06/24/17 Re: Cost of Freedom [Re: skitish]  
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websterparish47 Offline
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websterparish47  Offline
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Northwest corner of Louisiana
The war is never over in your mind.

#12117178 - 06/28/17 Re: Cost of Freedom [Re: skitish]  
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wabigoon Offline
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Iowa/NW Ontaio
The deepest Thank You! to all that let us live as we do.


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#12127510 - 07/04/17 Re: Cost of Freedom [Re: skitish]  
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jkingrph Offline
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jkingrph  Offline
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E. Texas, N. Louisiana
I spent 10 years active in the USAF during the Vietnam era. I did not make it over there as there was not too much demand for my allied medical profession there, there usually being only one or two pharmacists in country, but instead spent two years in Turkey. Called up later as reservist for Desert Storm, at a contingency hospital in the UK, so luckily have never seen combat or been in a combat zone as many thousands of service personnel. I did have to deal somewhat with those who returned from those combat zones, and even worse with the families of those serving in those zones and the one who had lost loved ones. Even being detached from the immediate ugliness it is sometimes difficult to deal with the long reaching costs.

#12160204 - 07/21/17 Re: Cost of Freedom [Re: jkingrph]  
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Kodiakisland Offline
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Kodiakisland  Offline
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AK..CO..MO..CO..EU..AR..next??...
Originally Posted by jkingrph
I spent 10 years active in the USAF during the Vietnam era. I did not make it over there as there was not too much demand for my allied medical profession there, there usually being only one or two pharmacists in country, but instead spent two years in Turkey. Called up later as reservist for Desert Storm, at a contingency hospital in the UK, so luckily have never seen combat or been in a combat zone as many thousands of service personnel. I did have to deal somewhat with those who returned from those combat zones, and even worse with the families of those serving in those zones and the one who had lost loved ones. Even being detached from the immediate ugliness it is sometimes difficult to deal with the long reaching costs.



Things have changed quite a bit for pharmacists in combat zones. There aren't many Army pharmacist who haven't deployed at least once. I've been lucky in that regard. I've volunteered for deployments several times but just haven't been picked. I did spend 3 years at Landstuhl as the clinical pharmacist for the trauma surgeons. Our patients were 12-36 hours post injury. We got 2-3 plane loads every day. The shear number of wounded was staggering. Before going to Landstuhl I was at Ft Carson and didn't have any idea how many wounded there were.

I was an enlisted 11B during Desert Storm and did not deploy even though our unit was supposed to. Hated it then, but see it as a blessing now. Will retire from the reserves next year and be done. My wife still has 6 years left in the Air Force and my son has 2 yrs left on his enlistment as a Marine. He is due to deploy sometime next year. If Trump does anything at all for this country I hope it is to get us out of the Middle East for good.


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