24hourcampfire.com
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 16,182
Campfire Kahuna
OP Offline
Campfire Kahuna
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 16,182
https://www.texasmonthly.com/news-politics/border-patrol-uvalde-shooter/?

Customs and Border Protection is a ubiquitous presence in many Texas communities, and agents are often first responders.


Marco Bello/Reuters

May 26, 2022

When Border Patrol radios crackled with a request for aid from local Uvalde police on Tuesday, it was nothing out of the ordinary. Agents often act as first responders to emergencies in their communities. The alert on Tuesday, however, was horrific: a gunman had entered Robb Elementary School.

Customs and Border Protection agents were among the first to respond to the mass shooting, in which at least nineteen children and two teachers were killed. That response speaks to the outsized role CBP has in small towns near the border, like Uvalde.

A CBP official told Texas Monthly that as emergency calls first came in, four agents with CBP’s Bortac SWAT team were investigating stash houses on the border to the west of Uvalde. The agents immediately responded, arriving at the school just before noon. Bortac (Border Patrol Tactical Unit) is CBP’s’s paramilitary force, an elite group of agents trained to exchange gunfire with cartels. Border Patrol agents not in the SWAT unit also rushed to the school, for more personal reasons: their own children were in the building.

But as the news came in, the heavy presence of CPB agents led some on social media to loudly question why immigration officers were so prominent on the scene. (Some of the posts conflated CBP with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.)

The agents’ presence at the school was easily explicable: they are everywhere in Uvalde. CBP’s white and green SUVs are familiar sights around the town, which is fewer than eighty miles from northern Mexico, and thus well within the hundred-mile “border zone” where CBP operates. Like many Texas towns in this zone, Uvalde hosts a permanent CBP checkpoint, where agents stop and inspect vehicles going north along the highway. In a town of about 15,000, CBP is a major employer, offering about 150 unionized jobs with solid salaries and government benefits. Many residents have at least one family member or friend who works for the agency.

In all, as many as eighty CBP agents, including some who were off duty, rushed to the school during and after the shooting. According to the CBP official, three Bortac agents engaged the shooter in gunfire — with one holding a shield — after entering Robb Elementary along with local and state law-enforcement officers. One Bortac agent was wounded, but not critically. The CBP official told Texas Monthly that it’s “unclear which bullet from which gun” struck the shooter and killed him.

In the wake of the shooting, CBP agents provided medical assistance and helped with the effort to reunite children with their families. But the presence of the agents at the school, in a town with some undocumented residents, gave some observers pause. William Lopez, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan who studies fear in immigrant communities, immediately worried about the anxieties undocumented parents might experience. “Border Patrol also on the scene,” he wrote in a widely shared tweet on Tuesday afternoon. “I pray for those parents fearing that their kids are dead and debating whether or not they’ll be arrested if they go to find out.”

There are no reliable figures on what percentage of Uvalde residents are undocumented; most assumptions that the town has a large undocumented population seemed to stem from the fact that it is 72.7 percent Hispanic. According to 2020 estimates from the Census Bureau, 10.4 percent of Uvalde residents were foreign-born; of that population, 69 percent were not naturalized U.S. citizens. Whatever the real numbers, it’s true that on any given day, immigration enforcement is visible around town. At Uvalde’s CBP checkpoint, undocumented drivers and passengers headed north are frequently arrested and eventually transferred to ICE custody and subject to deportation proceedings.

When responding to public emergencies, however, CBP has a policy of not engaging in immigration enforcement, and schools at all times are considered “protected zones” where agents typically refrain from arrests. On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security (home to CBP and ICE) published a statement intended to clarify agents’ role during the ongoing response to the shooting: “The site of the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas is a protected area. To the fullest extent possible, ICE and CBP will not conduct immigration enforcement activities there so that individuals, regardless of immigration status, can seek assistance, reunify with family and loved ones, and otherwise address the tragedy that occurred.” In addition, the statement read, “ICE and CBP provide emergency assistance to individuals regardless of their immigration status.”

Considering that this message was published the day after parents had rushed to the reunification center, it’s unclear whether it assuaged any potential fears. The language of “to the fullest extent possible” also left the policy somewhat ambiguous.

Customs and Border Protection has drawn criticism in the past for its role in non-immigration-related activities. In 2020, Bortac was mobilized during protests in Portland, Oregon, in reaction to the murder of George Floyd. Agents dressed in black “disappeared” protesters into vans without identifying themselves as police, and dispensed tear gas and projectiles that may have injured at least one person. The incident brought new scrutiny to Bortac’s origins as a riot-control force in immigrant detention centers—and to its transformation into a full-fledged paramilitary organization that had been mobilized in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Those who saw Border Patrol agents at Robb Elementary School had reasons to be skeptical. But the reality is that across the Texas border region, Customs and Border Protection is a fact of life. In small towns, when someone calls 911 to report a medical emergency or an active crime, Border Patrol agents often arrive sooner than overwhelmed local first responders. (The agency is one of the largest federal law enforcement agencies in the world; it employs almost twice as many people as the FBI.) Because CPB draws employees from local populations along the border, the agents are also more than 50 percent Hispanic. It’s hard to overstate the ubiquity of the agents in southern Texas. In a place like Uvalde, they’re not just in town; in some respects, they are the town.


Originally Posted by jorgeI
...Actually Sycamore, you are sort of right....
BP-B2

Joined: Apr 2022
Posts: 516
2
Campfire Regular
Offline
Campfire Regular
2
Joined: Apr 2022
Posts: 516
In short, without 10 zillion illegals a month crossing the borders, they wouldn't have been there to help. Illegals good for school shootings.

Joined: May 2017
Posts: 1,267
S
Campfire Regular
Offline
Campfire Regular
S
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 1,267
I read there was something like 80 border patrol officers on scene. Those officers likely had multiple kids in the school. Their tactical team is a step up from that of the public school’s 5-member police force.

Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Because it’s near the Border, where your Hero Hiden Biden and his DemoRat Commie Sociallist Handlers are flooding TX with millions of new Welfare Sucking Voter Base. So they won’t have to steal the Next Election. 😡

Last edited by chlinstructor; 05/28/22.

"Allways speak the truth and you will never have to remember what you said before..." Sam Houston
Texans, "We say Grace, We Say Mam, If You Don't Like it, We Don't Give a Damn!"

~Molɔ̀ːn Labé Skýla~
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,507
7
79S Online Content
Campfire Kahuna
Online Content
Campfire Kahuna
7
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,507
Originally Posted by Sycamore
https://www.texasmonthly.com/news-politics/border-patrol-uvalde-shooter/?

Customs and Border Protection is a ubiquitous presence in many Texas communities, and agents are often first responders.


Marco Bello/Reuters

May 26, 2022

When Border Patrol radios crackled with a request for aid from local Uvalde police on Tuesday, it was nothing out of the ordinary. Agents often act as first responders to emergencies in their communities. The alert on Tuesday, however, was horrific: a gunman had entered Robb Elementary School.

Customs and Border Protection agents were among the first to respond to the mass shooting, in which at least nineteen children and two teachers were killed. That response speaks to the outsized role CBP has in small towns near the border, like Uvalde.

A CBP official told Texas Monthly that as emergency calls first came in, four agents with CBP’s Bortac SWAT team were investigating stash houses on the border to the west of Uvalde. The agents immediately responded, arriving at the school just before noon. Bortac (Border Patrol Tactical Unit) is CBP’s’s paramilitary force, an elite group of agents trained to exchange gunfire with cartels. Border Patrol agents not in the SWAT unit also rushed to the school, for more personal reasons: their own children were in the building.

But as the news came in, the heavy presence of CPB agents led some on social media to loudly question why immigration officers were so prominent on the scene. (Some of the posts conflated CBP with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.)

The agents’ presence at the school was easily explicable: they are everywhere in Uvalde. CBP’s white and green SUVs are familiar sights around the town, which is fewer than eighty miles from northern Mexico, and thus well within the hundred-mile “border zone” where CBP operates. Like many Texas towns in this zone, Uvalde hosts a permanent CBP checkpoint, where agents stop and inspect vehicles going north along the highway. In a town of about 15,000, CBP is a major employer, offering about 150 unionized jobs with solid salaries and government benefits. Many residents have at least one family member or friend who works for the agency.

In all, as many as eighty CBP agents, including some who were off duty, rushed to the school during and after the shooting. According to the CBP official, three Bortac agents engaged the shooter in gunfire — with one holding a shield — after entering Robb Elementary along with local and state law-enforcement officers. One Bortac agent was wounded, but not critically. The CBP official told Texas Monthly that it’s “unclear which bullet from which gun” struck the shooter and killed him.

In the wake of the shooting, CBP agents provided medical assistance and helped with the effort to reunite children with their families. But the presence of the agents at the school, in a town with some undocumented residents, gave some observers pause. William Lopez, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan who studies fear in immigrant communities, immediately worried about the anxieties undocumented parents might experience. “Border Patrol also on the scene,” he wrote in a widely shared tweet on Tuesday afternoon. “I pray for those parents fearing that their kids are dead and debating whether or not they’ll be arrested if they go to find out.”

There are no reliable figures on what percentage of Uvalde residents are undocumented; most assumptions that the town has a large undocumented population seemed to stem from the fact that it is 72.7 percent Hispanic. According to 2020 estimates from the Census Bureau, 10.4 percent of Uvalde residents were foreign-born; of that population, 69 percent were not naturalized U.S. citizens. Whatever the real numbers, it’s true that on any given day, immigration enforcement is visible around town. At Uvalde’s CBP checkpoint, undocumented drivers and passengers headed north are frequently arrested and eventually transferred to ICE custody and subject to deportation proceedings.

When responding to public emergencies, however, CBP has a policy of not engaging in immigration enforcement, and schools at all times are considered “protected zones” where agents typically refrain from arrests. On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security (home to CBP and ICE) published a statement intended to clarify agents’ role during the ongoing response to the shooting: “The site of the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas is a protected area. To the fullest extent possible, ICE and CBP will not conduct immigration enforcement activities there so that individuals, regardless of immigration status, can seek assistance, reunify with family and loved ones, and otherwise address the tragedy that occurred.” In addition, the statement read, “ICE and CBP provide emergency assistance to individuals regardless of their immigration status.”

Considering that this message was published the day after parents had rushed to the reunification center, it’s unclear whether it assuaged any potential fears. The language of “to the fullest extent possible” also left the policy somewhat ambiguous.

Customs and Border Protection has drawn criticism in the past for its role in non-immigration-related activities. In 2020, Bortac was mobilized during protests in Portland, Oregon, in reaction to the murder of George Floyd. Agents dressed in black “disappeared” protesters into vans without identifying themselves as police, and dispensed tear gas and projectiles that may have injured at least one person. The incident brought new scrutiny to Bortac’s origins as a riot-control force in immigrant detention centers—and to its transformation into a full-fledged paramilitary organization that had been mobilized in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Those who saw Border Patrol agents at Robb Elementary School had reasons to be skeptical. But the reality is that across the Texas border region, Customs and Border Protection is a fact of life. In small towns, when someone calls 911 to report a medical emergency or an active crime, Border Patrol agents often arrive sooner than overwhelmed local first responders. (The agency is one of the largest federal law enforcement agencies in the world; it employs almost twice as many people as the FBI.) Because CPB draws employees from local populations along the border, the agents are also more than 50 percent Hispanic. It’s hard to overstate the ubiquity of the agents in southern Texas. In a place like Uvalde, they’re not just in town; in some respects, they are the town.


Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…


Originally Posted by Bricktop
Then STFU. The rest of your statement is superflous bullshit with no real bearing on this discussion other than to massage your own ego.
IC-A B3

Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 4,325
S
Campfire Guide
Offline
Campfire Guide
S
Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 4,325
All hands on deck and they were close. Why does this even have to be explained?

Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 9,498
A
Campfire Outfitter
Offline
Campfire Outfitter
A
Joined: Sep 2013
Posts: 9,498
Originally Posted by Sako76
All hands on deck and they were close. Why does this even have to be explained?

Because this is the 24 hour conspiracyfire.

Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 63,595
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
Joined: Aug 2004
Posts: 63,595
Originally Posted by Sako76
All hands on deck and they were close. Why does this even have to be explained?


Because half of our country is too stupid to think for themselves.

They have to be told what to think.

That's why celebrities, sports figures, politicians, and the media are held in such high regard by them.


Molɔ̀ːn Labé Skýla!
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,867
B
Campfire Guide
Offline
Campfire Guide
B
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,867
Originally Posted by rockinbbar
Originally Posted by Sako76
All hands on deck and they were close. Why does this even have to be explained?


Because half of our country is too stupid to think for themselves.

They have to be told what to think.

That's why celebrities, sports figures, politicians, and the media are held in such high regard by them.
Well, a very good (and rhetorical) question and a proper answer answer thrown in...


"Firm yet rude. That should be my sig line!"
*** Ironbender

"You've been here longer than the State of Alaska is old!"
*** my Grandaughters

Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 11,518
A
Campfire 'Bwana
Online Content
Campfire 'Bwana
A
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 11,518
Originally Posted by chlinstructor
Because it’s near the Border, where your Hero Hiden Biden and his DemoRat Commie Sociallist Handlers are flooding TX with millions of new Welfare Sucking Voter Base. So they won’t have to steal the Next Election. 😡
So you’re a cosmetology instructor?



[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]


Let’s go ,Brandon!


[Linked Image from ]
IC-B B4

Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 5,230
S
Campfire Tracker
Offline
Campfire Tracker
S
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 5,230
I guess I shouldn't be surprised that in this one of the worst scenarios for parents that somebody would piss and moan that CBP was on scene and ended it but here I am shaking my head to see if I read it wrong. Those kinds of people need to end it for themselves and save us all.


Fight fire, save lives, laugh in the face of danger.

Stupid always finds a way.
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Originally Posted by alwaysoutdoors
Originally Posted by chlinstructor
Because it’s near the Border, where your Hero Hiden Biden and his DemoRat Commie Sociallist Handlers are flooding TX with millions of new Welfare Sucking Voter Base. So they won’t have to steal the Next Election. 😡
So you’re a cosmetology instructor?



[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

AlwaysHoldsFlavesCock,
Easy to see I’m living Rent Free in your pointy little head. Must suck to be you. You’re a sad little bitch. And not even funny either. Off with you now. Jealousy does not become you. 😂😂😂

Last edited by chlinstructor; 05/28/22.

"Allways speak the truth and you will never have to remember what you said before..." Sam Houston
Texans, "We say Grace, We Say Mam, If You Don't Like it, We Don't Give a Damn!"

~Molɔ̀ːn Labé Skýla~
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 16,182
Campfire Kahuna
OP Offline
Campfire Kahuna
Joined: Dec 2003
Posts: 16,182
Originally Posted by 79S
Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

I didn't get that from the article? maybe I read it wrong.

I thought it was just explaining where Uvalde is, what life is like, and how many CBP there are within 100 miles of the southern border.

news to plenty of Americans (maybe even Texans) that don't live, work, or travel near the border.

Probably including many on the Campfire.

Texas Monthly published it, so they must have thought it bore explanation


Originally Posted by jorgeI
...Actually Sycamore, you are sort of right....
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 14,377
B
Campfire 'Bwana
Offline
Campfire 'Bwana
B
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 14,377
Originally Posted by Sycamore
Originally Posted by 79S
Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

I didn't get that from the article? maybe I read it wrong.

I thought it was just explaining where Uvalde is, what life is like, and how many CBP there are within 100 miles of the southern border.

news to plenty of Americans (maybe even Texans) that don't live, work, or travel near the border.

Probably including many on the Campfire.

Texas Monthly published it, so they must have thought it bore explanation

Does anyone in real life buy the passive aggressive bullshît to try to pass off on here?

Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,507
7
79S Online Content
Campfire Kahuna
Online Content
Campfire Kahuna
7
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 16,507
Originally Posted by Sycamore
Originally Posted by 79S
Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

I didn't get that from the article? maybe I read it wrong.

I thought it was just explaining where Uvalde is, what life is like, and how many CBP there are within 100 miles of the southern border.

news to plenty of Americans (maybe even Texans) that don't live, work, or travel near the border.

Probably including many on the Campfire.

Texas Monthly published it, so they must have thought it bore explanation

Go read thst article again.. read it slow.. do you ask that question when you are in southern Arizona? Tucson, Naco, Douglas, Sonoita, Casa Grande, Yuma??

Last edited by 79S; 05/28/22.

Originally Posted by Bricktop
Then STFU. The rest of your statement is superflous bullshit with no real bearing on this discussion other than to massage your own ego.
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 69,834
J
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
J
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 69,834
Originally Posted by 79S
Originally Posted by Sycamore
https://www.texasmonthly.com/news-politics/border-patrol-uvalde-shooter/?

Customs and Border Protection is a ubiquitous presence in many Texas communities, and agents are often first responders.


Marco Bello/Reuters

May 26, 2022

When Border Patrol radios crackled with a request for aid from local Uvalde police on Tuesday, it was nothing out of the ordinary. Agents often act as first responders to emergencies in their communities. The alert on Tuesday, however, was horrific: a gunman had entered Robb Elementary School.

Customs and Border Protection agents were among the first to respond to the mass shooting, in which at least nineteen children and two teachers were killed. That response speaks to the outsized role CBP has in small towns near the border, like Uvalde.

A CBP official told Texas Monthly that as emergency calls first came in, four agents with CBP’s Bortac SWAT team were investigating stash houses on the border to the west of Uvalde. The agents immediately responded, arriving at the school just before noon. Bortac (Border Patrol Tactical Unit) is CBP’s’s paramilitary force, an elite group of agents trained to exchange gunfire with cartels. Border Patrol agents not in the SWAT unit also rushed to the school, for more personal reasons: their own children were in the building.

But as the news came in, the heavy presence of CPB agents led some on social media to loudly question why immigration officers were so prominent on the scene. (Some of the posts conflated CBP with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.)

The agents’ presence at the school was easily explicable: they are everywhere in Uvalde. CBP’s white and green SUVs are familiar sights around the town, which is fewer than eighty miles from northern Mexico, and thus well within the hundred-mile “border zone” where CBP operates. Like many Texas towns in this zone, Uvalde hosts a permanent CBP checkpoint, where agents stop and inspect vehicles going north along the highway. In a town of about 15,000, CBP is a major employer, offering about 150 unionized jobs with solid salaries and government benefits. Many residents have at least one family member or friend who works for the agency.

In all, as many as eighty CBP agents, including some who were off duty, rushed to the school during and after the shooting. According to the CBP official, three Bortac agents engaged the shooter in gunfire — with one holding a shield — after entering Robb Elementary along with local and state law-enforcement officers. One Bortac agent was wounded, but not critically. The CBP official told Texas Monthly that it’s “unclear which bullet from which gun” struck the shooter and killed him.

In the wake of the shooting, CBP agents provided medical assistance and helped with the effort to reunite children with their families. But the presence of the agents at the school, in a town with some undocumented residents, gave some observers pause. William Lopez, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan who studies fear in immigrant communities, immediately worried about the anxieties undocumented parents might experience. “Border Patrol also on the scene,” he wrote in a widely shared tweet on Tuesday afternoon. “I pray for those parents fearing that their kids are dead and debating whether or not they’ll be arrested if they go to find out.”

There are no reliable figures on what percentage of Uvalde residents are undocumented; most assumptions that the town has a large undocumented population seemed to stem from the fact that it is 72.7 percent Hispanic. According to 2020 estimates from the Census Bureau, 10.4 percent of Uvalde residents were foreign-born; of that population, 69 percent were not naturalized U.S. citizens. Whatever the real numbers, it’s true that on any given day, immigration enforcement is visible around town. At Uvalde’s CBP checkpoint, undocumented drivers and passengers headed north are frequently arrested and eventually transferred to ICE custody and subject to deportation proceedings.

When responding to public emergencies, however, CBP has a policy of not engaging in immigration enforcement, and schools at all times are considered “protected zones” where agents typically refrain from arrests. On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security (home to CBP and ICE) published a statement intended to clarify agents’ role during the ongoing response to the shooting: “The site of the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas is a protected area. To the fullest extent possible, ICE and CBP will not conduct immigration enforcement activities there so that individuals, regardless of immigration status, can seek assistance, reunify with family and loved ones, and otherwise address the tragedy that occurred.” In addition, the statement read, “ICE and CBP provide emergency assistance to individuals regardless of their immigration status.”

Considering that this message was published the day after parents had rushed to the reunification center, it’s unclear whether it assuaged any potential fears. The language of “to the fullest extent possible” also left the policy somewhat ambiguous.

Customs and Border Protection has drawn criticism in the past for its role in non-immigration-related activities. In 2020, Bortac was mobilized during protests in Portland, Oregon, in reaction to the murder of George Floyd. Agents dressed in black “disappeared” protesters into vans without identifying themselves as police, and dispensed tear gas and projectiles that may have injured at least one person. The incident brought new scrutiny to Bortac’s origins as a riot-control force in immigrant detention centers—and to its transformation into a full-fledged paramilitary organization that had been mobilized in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Those who saw Border Patrol agents at Robb Elementary School had reasons to be skeptical. But the reality is that across the Texas border region, Customs and Border Protection is a fact of life. In small towns, when someone calls 911 to report a medical emergency or an active crime, Border Patrol agents often arrive sooner than overwhelmed local first responders. (The agency is one of the largest federal law enforcement agencies in the world; it employs almost twice as many people as the FBI.) Because CPB draws employees from local populations along the border, the agents are also more than 50 percent Hispanic. It’s hard to overstate the ubiquity of the agents in southern Texas. In a place like Uvalde, they’re not just in town; in some respects, they are the town.


Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

Well, they ought to be riding horses on the border and whipping schiett out of those breaking our border laws.

Last edited by jaguartx; 05/28/22.

Ecc 10:2
The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but that of a fool to the left.

A Nation which leaves God behind is soon left behind.

"The Lord never asked anyone to be a tax collector, lowyer, or Redskins fan".

I Dindo Nuffin
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 69,834
J
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
J
Joined: Jan 2016
Posts: 69,834
Originally Posted by Sycamore
Originally Posted by 79S
Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

I didn't get that from the article? maybe I read it wrong.

I thought it was just explaining where Uvalde is, what life is like, and how many CBP there are within 100 miles of the southern border.

news to plenty of Americans (maybe even Texans) that don't live, work, or travel near the border.

Probably including many on the Campfire.

Texas Monthly published it, so they must have thought it bore explanation

You sure read Zerobama, Kilery and the Bidet wrong.


Ecc 10:2
The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but that of a fool to the left.

A Nation which leaves God behind is soon left behind.

"The Lord never asked anyone to be a tax collector, lowyer, or Redskins fan".

I Dindo Nuffin
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Campfire Oracle
Online Content
Campfire Oracle
Joined: Apr 2011
Posts: 57,932
Originally Posted by BillyGoatGruff
Originally Posted by Sycamore
Originally Posted by 79S
Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

I didn't get that from the article? maybe I read it wrong.

I thought it was just explaining where Uvalde is, what life is like, and how many CBP there are within 100 miles of the southern border.

news to plenty of Americans (maybe even Texans) that don't live, work, or travel near the border.

Probably including many on the Campfire.

Texas Monthly published it, so they must have thought it bore explanation

Does anyone in real life buy the passive aggressive bullshît to try to pass off on here?

No.


"Allways speak the truth and you will never have to remember what you said before..." Sam Houston
Texans, "We say Grace, We Say Mam, If You Don't Like it, We Don't Give a Damn!"

~Molɔ̀ːn Labé Skýla~
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 116,207
T
Campfire Oracle
Offline
Campfire Oracle
T
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 116,207
They were the heroes of the story. Too bad they didn't get there sooner.


"Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined.”

Patrick Henry
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,538
Campfire Outfitter
Online Content
Campfire Outfitter
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,538
Originally Posted by 79S
Originally Posted by Sycamore
https://www.texasmonthly.com/news-politics/border-patrol-uvalde-shooter/?

Customs and Border Protection is a ubiquitous presence in many Texas communities, and agents are often first responders.


Marco Bello/Reuters

May 26, 2022

When Border Patrol radios crackled with a request for aid from local Uvalde police on Tuesday, it was nothing out of the ordinary. Agents often act as first responders to emergencies in their communities. The alert on Tuesday, however, was horrific: a gunman had entered Robb Elementary School.

Customs and Border Protection agents were among the first to respond to the mass shooting, in which at least nineteen children and two teachers were killed. That response speaks to the outsized role CBP has in small towns near the border, like Uvalde.

A CBP official told Texas Monthly that as emergency calls first came in, four agents with CBP’s Bortac SWAT team were investigating stash houses on the border to the west of Uvalde. The agents immediately responded, arriving at the school just before noon. Bortac (Border Patrol Tactical Unit) is CBP’s’s paramilitary force, an elite group of agents trained to exchange gunfire with cartels. Border Patrol agents not in the SWAT unit also rushed to the school, for more personal reasons: their own children were in the building.

But as the news came in, the heavy presence of CPB agents led some on social media to loudly question why immigration officers were so prominent on the scene. (Some of the posts conflated CBP with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.)

The agents’ presence at the school was easily explicable: they are everywhere in Uvalde. CBP’s white and green SUVs are familiar sights around the town, which is fewer than eighty miles from northern Mexico, and thus well within the hundred-mile “border zone” where CBP operates. Like many Texas towns in this zone, Uvalde hosts a permanent CBP checkpoint, where agents stop and inspect vehicles going north along the highway. In a town of about 15,000, CBP is a major employer, offering about 150 unionized jobs with solid salaries and government benefits. Many residents have at least one family member or friend who works for the agency.

In all, as many as eighty CBP agents, including some who were off duty, rushed to the school during and after the shooting. According to the CBP official, three Bortac agents engaged the shooter in gunfire — with one holding a shield — after entering Robb Elementary along with local and state law-enforcement officers. One Bortac agent was wounded, but not critically. The CBP official told Texas Monthly that it’s “unclear which bullet from which gun” struck the shooter and killed him.

In the wake of the shooting, CBP agents provided medical assistance and helped with the effort to reunite children with their families. But the presence of the agents at the school, in a town with some undocumented residents, gave some observers pause. William Lopez, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan who studies fear in immigrant communities, immediately worried about the anxieties undocumented parents might experience. “Border Patrol also on the scene,” he wrote in a widely shared tweet on Tuesday afternoon. “I pray for those parents fearing that their kids are dead and debating whether or not they’ll be arrested if they go to find out.”

There are no reliable figures on what percentage of Uvalde residents are undocumented; most assumptions that the town has a large undocumented population seemed to stem from the fact that it is 72.7 percent Hispanic. According to 2020 estimates from the Census Bureau, 10.4 percent of Uvalde residents were foreign-born; of that population, 69 percent were not naturalized U.S. citizens. Whatever the real numbers, it’s true that on any given day, immigration enforcement is visible around town. At Uvalde’s CBP checkpoint, undocumented drivers and passengers headed north are frequently arrested and eventually transferred to ICE custody and subject to deportation proceedings.

When responding to public emergencies, however, CBP has a policy of not engaging in immigration enforcement, and schools at all times are considered “protected zones” where agents typically refrain from arrests. On Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security (home to CBP and ICE) published a statement intended to clarify agents’ role during the ongoing response to the shooting: “The site of the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas is a protected area. To the fullest extent possible, ICE and CBP will not conduct immigration enforcement activities there so that individuals, regardless of immigration status, can seek assistance, reunify with family and loved ones, and otherwise address the tragedy that occurred.” In addition, the statement read, “ICE and CBP provide emergency assistance to individuals regardless of their immigration status.”

Considering that this message was published the day after parents had rushed to the reunification center, it’s unclear whether it assuaged any potential fears. The language of “to the fullest extent possible” also left the policy somewhat ambiguous.

Customs and Border Protection has drawn criticism in the past for its role in non-immigration-related activities. In 2020, Bortac was mobilized during protests in Portland, Oregon, in reaction to the murder of George Floyd. Agents dressed in black “disappeared” protesters into vans without identifying themselves as police, and dispensed tear gas and projectiles that may have injured at least one person. The incident brought new scrutiny to Bortac’s origins as a riot-control force in immigrant detention centers—and to its transformation into a full-fledged paramilitary organization that had been mobilized in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Those who saw Border Patrol agents at Robb Elementary School had reasons to be skeptical. But the reality is that across the Texas border region, Customs and Border Protection is a fact of life. In small towns, when someone calls 911 to report a medical emergency or an active crime, Border Patrol agents often arrive sooner than overwhelmed local first responders. (The agency is one of the largest federal law enforcement agencies in the world; it employs almost twice as many people as the FBI.) Because CPB draws employees from local populations along the border, the agents are also more than 50 percent Hispanic. It’s hard to overstate the ubiquity of the agents in southern Texas. In a place like Uvalde, they’re not just in town; in some respects, they are the town.


Wtf is wrong with this country when people cry too many CBP showed up to help. This country is ph ucked…

Exactly.

The stupid crap that has surrounded this event is unreal.


Many of the same people who have never done anything more dangerous than slip in the shower and have been in the last number of years have bitched the narrative:

"Defund the police"

The police are too militarized"

"The police don't need AR-15s"

"They should have revolvers"

Are the same crowd who are now saying:


"They could have made entry with breaching tools carried in their trunks


"Why didn't the police use an explosive breach on the classroom door"

"They should have used "flashbangs" to do Blah Blah Blah"



They want their local officer to be Barney Fife with no training or equipment, then suddenly transform into a Tier 1 Operator at the flip of a switch, complete with all the training that comes with team that does hostage rescue full time. But they don't actually want to pay for it.

GMAFB


THE CHAIR IS AGAINST THE WALL.

The Tikka T3 in .308 Winchester is the Glock 19 of the rifle world.
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  RickBin, SYSOP 

Link Copied to Clipboard
CTV-TRX
Who's Online Now
674 members (10gaugeman, 007FJ, 06hunter59, 10gaugemag, 1234, 16penny, 74 invisible), 1,993 guests, and 1,213 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
RR2/3-22

UDG-IP









Fish & Game Departments | Solunar Tables | Mission Statement | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | DMCA
Hunting | Fishing | Camping | Backpacking | Reloading | Campfire Forums | Gear Shop
Copyright © 2000-2022 24hourcampfire.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.3.33 Page Time: 0.066s Queries: 15 (0.003s) Memory: 0.9837 MB (Peak: 1.2025 MB) Data Comp: Zlib Server Time: 2022-06-29 22:32:06 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS