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Great info in this thread. Bunny or mickey mouse boots require a set of knee high boots to ensure that flesh stays attached to the calves.

In non crazy temps, or in some activity i like a pair of cheap "gerry" insulated pants from Costco. Layer under them for conditions. I confess that I like them largely because they are cheap, but they are also warm enough.

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This question would be so much easier except for the hands and feet part 😊

So hard to work with hands at ultra low temps. After digging 4 inches of snow out of the scope sunshade on 11/4 here in AZ, temp about 24, operating the Binocular and scope knobs was stupid difficult. Glad we saw no bulls. Dunno how anyone could do it sub zero. But it’s normal here to glass for hours grasping cold metal and plastic.


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If you can find one, the pre Bass pro Cabela's Trans-Alaska Anorak parka works well and are still popular out here. It's a good outer layer. When it's really cold and windy, one of my sealskin hats come out. I like a good set of bibs over a full suit but whatever works for you. I have seen mushers wear a full suit and then put a insulated anorak over the suit. My hands are the hardest and I don't take the cold like I used to. If you layer like what was recommended, you are off to a good start.

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Originally Posted by ol_mike
I read years ago that the bunny boots weren't a boot for hiking.

I'm going to hunt ML/wolf/bear hunt until I keel over. Trap too, so I'll need a good deep winter hiking boot.

Going to 'plant' some equipment afield tents/tarps/propane [where legal lol] to keep from toting/hauling so much.
I wore them for most of 18 months in the 70's. They suck at walking in snow, especially on sloping ground. I have some Muck Arctic boots that have a cleat sole that are almost too warm for Iowa but would probably be great down to -40 with the right socks. They are much better walking in the snow verses the bunny boots.

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Originally Posted by Talus_in_Arizona
This question would be so much easier except for the hands and feet part 😊

So hard to work with hands at ultra low temps. After digging 4 inches of snow out of the scope sunshade on 11/4 here in AZ, temp about 24, operating the Binocular and scope knobs was stupid difficult. Glad we saw no bulls. Dunno how anyone could do it sub zero. But it’s normal here to glass for hours grasping cold metal and plastic.
Put your big bino on a tripod...


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Originally Posted by Sitka deer
Originally Posted by Talus_in_Arizona
This question would be so much easier except for the hands and feet part 😊

So hard to work with hands at ultra low temps. After digging 4 inches of snow out of the scope sunshade on 11/4 here in AZ, temp about 24, operating the Binocular and scope knobs was stupid difficult. Glad we saw no bulls. Dunno how anyone could do it sub zero. But it’s normal here to glass for hours grasping cold metal and plastic.
Put your big bino on a tripod...

Of course it's on a tripod. How else would one use an 18x?


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Not much touching required when glassing with them.


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Originally Posted by Sitka deer
Not much touching required when glassing with them.


I touch the binocular and tripod constantly while glassing. There's no other way to do it elk hunting. Best I can do is swap hands frequently.


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I only live 30 miles above the Arctic Circle so I'm not as FAR north as a guy can go but it does get chilly around here at times.

On the trapline I wear Apocalypse Design, Klim or some combo of the two depending on temp or if breaking new trail or just riding on a trail I've already put in. Fur hat for sure.

I have worn bunnys more than I care to remember but rarely do anymore. I love Steger Mukluks. The camo ones have a rubber coating on the moose hide that is pretty waterproof if you get in a little overflow. I carry an extra pair in case I get into a lot of overflow. They are super lightweight, very comfy and easy to pack an extra pair on the machine. I get them way over sized to allow for extra felt insoles and a sock layering system. Like wearing Crocs at 50 below! They aren't the best for snowshoeing, but I do a fair amount and get by.

The comment about a beard is real. I cut mine really short come winter because it freezes and becomes one with my neck gaiter if its very long.

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trapperJ,

Those Steger Mukluks look like what I need for super cold boots. Should work great in the dry western mountains.

How are they in steep rocky terrain, side-hilling, etc. .

The gloves look like winners too.


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Mainer in Alaska,
It appears a couple of those companies are out of business.

Agree with you on clothes like the Refridgewear, that stretch when you move. I've got to where I hate clothes that don't stretch [carhardt/etc.], they are 'house clothes'.


Bought a pair a Cloudveil pants 15 years ago and they spoiled me, got about 5 stretch type hunting pants.


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Originally Posted by ol_mike
trapperJ,

Those Steger Mukluks look like what I need for super cold boots. Should work great in the dry western mountains.

How are they in steep rocky terrain, side-hilling, etc. .

The gloves look like winners too.

No ankle support so they would suck if you covered much ground side hilling, especially if you were packing a heavy load. But riding the machine and general winter stuff they're great. There isn't any toe protection so don't try kicking frozen things!

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Thanks, that's about what I figured.

I've had good luck hunting in low to no ankle support boots. Always got by with 3/4 hikers.


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I am big on woolrich Malone Bibs and Woolrioch Alaskan wool shirts on top of poly pro long underwear, if really cold a layer of fleece 1/4 zip with high collar between long underwear and the heavy wool shirt. Match the weight of the underwear to the temp, polypro usually comes in 3 weights. I have always been a fan of wool for cold weather and have rarely found the need for more water protection in cold weather as the snow shakes and brushes off with ease. I would wear raingear when using a chainsaw to make through ice beaver sets, really wet work and kind of cold.

For a jaclet I have a couple of Filson Cruisers jackets, uninsulated anoraks for a wind break over the alaskan on a warm day with heavy wind. As you can probably tell I am a grand fan of layering and matching what I wear to the day include activity level in the . I used to wear wool balaclavas on cold days but have switched to polypro as they feel a lot better against my skin and wash up easier in a sink and are dry in the AM.

I have to admit I really like my insulated hooded Carhart jacket as the thing is just warm and will never pick up a sticker in the brush.

I have found great deals on the malones and alaskans lately on ebay as I would not want to buy them new if I can find them, good wool wears like iron as long as they weren't worn by a careless smoker.

That works for me, although not wintering in AK I have spent a lot of time in northern MN, and Ontario in the winter and gets a little brisk here, not Fairbanks cold but cold.

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A piece of clothing that does not get enough press is a facemask. A little wind in the below zero temps can really put a hurt on your face. Also, fur hats are the best for the coldest temps. I find they are really too warm most of the time and they also muffle a lot of sound when the ear flaps are down.


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Beaver and seal skin hats have been mentioned.

Any comments on a muskrat/wool bomber hat?
Do you get your hats from individual crafters, or are there any companies you would recommend?

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Originally Posted by pak
A piece of clothing that does not get enough press is a facemask. A little wind in the below zero temps can really put a hurt on your face. Also, fur hats are the best for the coldest temps. I find they are really too warm most of the time and they also muffle a lot of sound when the ear flaps are down.

Spot on. A light balaclava is in my kit here in AZ. In colder climes it would be a heavier balaclava.


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I’ve seen neoprene facemasks for sale to avoid frostbite. Never used one.
Anyone?


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Originally Posted by ironbender
I’ve seen neoprene facemasks for sale to avoid frostbite. Never used one.
Anyone?
Yeah I have one.. they work, but you’ve gotta keep them clean. They absorb sweat, snot, and spit so they can get funky. Only complaint is the Velcro on the back… it’s effing Velcro… the hooks collect lint, and catch on everything.


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Originally Posted by LoadClear
Originally Posted by ironbender
I’ve seen neoprene facemasks for sale to avoid frostbite. Never used one.
Anyone?
Yeah I have one.. they work, but you’ve gotta keep them clean. They absorb sweat, snot, and spit so they can get funky. Only complaint is the Velcro on the back… it’s effing Velcro… the hooks collect lint, and catch on everything.

That is the reason I don’t use a face mask or balaclava much. It’ll freeze solid around the mouth and nose area due to your breath and breathing. Then your whiskers get frozen into it. It ends up being more hassle than just dealing with the cold wind on your face.

Mad bomber style ear flaps are nice though. I have one made from some marten I trapped. That fur dude in downtown Fairbanks made it for me.



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