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More videos i watch and reviews i read on various models and brands of boots, i question the weight of boots.


Brand XYZ, one review says it’s lightweight, one guy says it’s ok. One guy says heavy….

What’s it for you ?

I wear steel toe boots all day at work, so any thing less than would be lightweight for me. I walk each evening in a pair of Hoka Clifton’s.

25oz a boot?

20oz?


Dave

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it seems always wet when i hunt in Minnesota plus most of the time i want to control my scent too,so i wear muck boots there easy on and off too . muck boots fit good i have walked many miles with muck boots on . i have light , medium and heavy insulated muck boots depends on the temp. and if i am going on a cold deer stand or walking. i seldom wear tie boots anymore but i always wear 2 pairs of socks , i do keep the inside of my boots dry with a boot dryer always.

Last edited by pete53; 03/31/23.

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BigDave;
Good morning to you sir, I hope that central Mississippi is getting appropriate weather and that you weren't affected by that tornado recently.

Boots...

When it comes to the topic of boots, one of the things I think that are missed a whole lot is the size of the person, thus the size of the boot because in my experience that makes a substantial difference.

We'll all talk about terrain, pack weight, wet or dry conditions, so that's helpful, but we seldom mention boot size.

Personally, I became aware of that as a factor years back when I bumped into another local sheep hunting and saw he had the same Canadian made boots on as mine. When I asked how he liked them, he said this was his second pair, that they were warranty because the first pair had broken on the welt with only a couple uses and the current pair looked like they were doing the same thing.

He was a big dude and I'm a little dude however, so my size 8½ boots were much, much stiffer than his size 12 or 13.

Now not all boots will be that way, but many are we've found.

We see that a lot in women's boots for sure too - that they're overly stiff in smaller sizes.

Now I've gone to Zamberlan Vioz GT boots since 2019 for early season boots and they're much lighter than my usual 11" tall Meindl boots.

The one downside is I get more spear grass seeds in them which is a pain. I could wear gaiters I know, but they're much warmer too which somewhat defeats the purpose for me.

Anyways, to wrap it up, if you have larger feet then you need to make sure that the lighter boots will still give you the support you require for the terrain you hope to traverse, you know?

Things I've noticed and all that.

Hope that made sense and was useful for you or someone out there.

All the best.

Dwayne


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Dwayne,

Yes, we dodged the tornadoes.

As always, thanks for sharing your knowledge.


In my original post, i should have mentioned i was talking of hiking boots.

There’s plenty of choices, but it’ll be internet shopping for me, not real gear stores around here..

Pete, i do hunt in rubber boots. Dryshod brand.


Dave

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BigDave;
Good afternoon sir, thanks for the reply.

I'm glad to read you were missed by the tornadoes for sure.

Sorry I wasn't more clear in my response and you were clear it was hiking boots.

That said, the lighter weight boots which might also give less support might be a stiff boot in say a size 7, just okay in a 10 and not give nearly enough support even for hiking on rough terrain in a 12 or 13.

Now I do get that I'm not answering your question head on, but using my lighter Zamberlan Vioz GT as an example, in my size and with my weight, they're fine for even medium heavy packs and some ugly sheep country - but - they might not be in a bigger size with a bigger user.

I apologize for perhaps over complicating the issue, but that's how I currently think those factors will affect what boot works for you.

In terms of do I feel better at the end of a tough stomp with lighter boots, yes absolutely.

Again, I'm a little old man though who is in decent to above average shape for someone who is in his early '60's.

Hope that makes a bit more sense.

Dwayne

PS extra thought.

For me using a walking stick - just an aluminum trekking pole has made at least as much difference as to how tired I don't feel as the lighter boots.

It was huge for me.


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When weather is mild I wear trail runners like Salamon's and bring the wal-mart croks for stream crossings. Use to be a boot fanatic but boots gather dust now adays.

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For hiking outside of hunting season it's trail runners (La Sportiva Akasha's); I tried trail runners as an experiment during hunting season and hauling meat and side-hilling make them no beuno

My hunting boots, while not really light, are relatively light for hunting boots- Crispi Thor II about 20 oz/boot in side 11. They are pretty stiff as well for a "lighter" boot, which I find I need in the mountains, especially with weight.

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I used trail runners for the first time on a summer backpack scouting trip last year. It was awesome. For the actual hunt, I wore what I used to think of as my lightweight hikers. Those are Lowa Renegades. I think that I could have just used the trail runners for the hunt though.

I used to wear Kennetrek mountain boots for archery and rifle season. Then started using the Renegades for archery. Now I don't even own a heavy mountain boot. I've been using the Renegades in the snow.

Less boot is working for me, but I think it's taken some time for my feet to adapt. I think wearing Croc-type flips did something weird to one of my feet. Since I ditched those cushy sandal things my foot seems a lot better.

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I wore a pair of Scarpa Rios for years. Went through 3 pairs of soles. Loved them, but they were quite heavy. Don’t know what they weighed, but the Rio was an old school leather mountaineering boot.

Now I am quite content with cheap lightweight hikers or trail running shoes. If it’s very wet, or cold and snow, I’ll wear pac’s or xtratuf’s.

My biggest bitch with most newer, more mountain oriented, boots is the narrowness of the sole. My ankles are pretty schit and regardless of the stiffness of the boot, the narrow soles seem to role my ankles far more than a cheap pair of nylon Costco “hiking boots”


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Count me in the movement towards light, low-top hiking shoes. I’ve done a lot of miles (500+) in low-top Solomon X-Ultra’s.

In my opinion and experience, this general type of shoe is the far better mousetrap.

I know the standard refrain in service of big tall clunky boots is ankle protection. But consider this. Your ankle is a critical part of the biomechanics of your leg as it articulates and flexes moment by moment to adjust to vagaries in the terrain. That’s a GOOD thing. It’s why evolution put the dang thing there. Reducing your ankle’s ability to flex doesn’t reduce the forces acting on your leg as it’s dealing with terrain; it just requires OTHER parts of your leg and body to compensate; knee, hip, foot, back, etc. That ain’t ideal.

If you’re still wearing big boots, the 70’s called, they want them back <g>.

Last edited by Jeff_O; 04/02/23.

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If I’m just out trail hiking I like lightweight trail shoes. Right now I’m using a pair of “ON” trail shoes and I really like them. Very light and comfortable. I even took them last year on my sheep hunt to use for crossing creeks and camp shoes. They’re light and seem to dry quickly.

If I’m mountain hunting I wear a leather boot. Meindl, Lowa, Kennetrek.
My favorite pair for mountain boots was Lowa Cevedale Tech Light Hunters. They were awesome. I’m a size 8 foot and not a big guy and these boots were light but with good stiffness under foot for heavy loads and good ankle mobility. They had narrower soles than other boots in the same size and with the good ankle mobility I felt very agile and comfortable in rocks. Only problem was they leaked like crazy right from new. I wore them way past their expiry date because of how good they felt. My sheep partner threatened to throw them away because my feet were soaked all the time ha ha. I really like the Kennetrek Hard Scrabble I have now, but they are heavier and wider sole so don’t feel as agile. But no wet feet anymore.

When cold weather deer hunting I wear Hoffman 14” Pac boots or a pair of Helly Hansen light weight winter boots.
The Hoffman’s are tall and very heavy but warm, good traction and good protection from getting wet.

The HH boots are extremely light and flexible like a shoe, and not as rugged as the Hoffman.

I seem to wear both depending on what I’m doing.

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A lot of great info..

Thanks.


Guess i should have put in OP,

At what weight do you consider light vs heavy?

It’s subjective i know, just trying to get a reference to compare reviews with…

One guys heavy is anther guys lightweight… vice versa.


Take for example the scarpa Kalaish trek gtx,

Bills video says it’s lightweight.
Jim’s video says they are heavy…


Dave

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i walk every day a mile or more and mostly outside i wear a size 13 light insulated muck boots ,2 pairs of socks and about 6 months a year we have snow i have no choice but to wear boots , so for me muck boots work great ,are really tuff and fit well too. its rare for dry weather where i live and right now we still have plenty snow will be weeks before its gone. i have wore muck boots in the wet snowy mountains all day long too. when you talk boot weight i worry more about dry and warm feet . i was a REA lineman / pole climber for 35 years in northern Minnesota so i understand boots and boots were important for me to have good boots always 7 days a week . this year i turn 70 years of age we climbed all poles in all weather conditions day or night we had no buckets my 1st 20 some years so lineman had to have real good boots . good luck with your choice,Pete53


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Originally Posted by BigDave39355
More videos i watch and reviews i read on various models and brands of boots, i question the weight of boots.


Brand XYZ, one review says it’s lightweight, one guy says it’s ok. One guy says heavy….

What’s it for you ?

I wear steel toe boots all day at work, so any thing less than would be lightweight for me. I walk each evening in a pair of Hoka Clifton’s.

25oz a boot?

20oz?


It kind of depends on what you're using them for IMO. For my one and only sheep hunt in AK I wore a pair of Hanwag GTX's and those are right at 26 oz. each. I consider those lightweight especially for that application.



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In a hunting boot anything sub 20oz is super light. I wear Crispi lapponia’s. They are 19oz. Best boot I have ever owned.


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Originally Posted by wagner
In a hunting boot anything sub 20oz is super light. I wear Crispi lapponia’s. They are 19oz. Best boot I have ever owned.

Have two pair. Stiff, but comfortable after a little break in.
Both have leaked. One badly.

Going back to Mendel perfects.


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Originally Posted by Jeff_O
Count me in the movement towards light, low-top hiking shoes. I’ve done a lot of miles (500+) in low-top Solomon X-Ultra’s.

In my opinion and experience, this general type of shoe is the far better mousetrap.

I know the standard refrain in service of big tall clunky boots is ankle protection. But consider this. Your ankle is a critical part of the biomechanics of your leg as it articulates and flexes moment by moment to adjust to vagaries in the terrain. That’s a GOOD thing. It’s why evolution put the dang thing there. Reducing your ankle’s ability to flex doesn’t reduce the forces acting on your leg as it’s dealing with terrain; it just requires OTHER parts of your leg and body to compensate; knee, hip, foot, back, etc. That ain’t ideal.

If you’re still wearing big boots, the 70’s called, they want them back <g>.


Your low tops should be almost perfect for you on a rocky side hill...

Last edited by battue; 04/04/23.

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Originally Posted by battue
Your low tops should be almost perfect for you on a rocky side hill...


And therein lies the rub. What's best for your uses usually won't be best for mine.



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Originally Posted by smokepole
Originally Posted by battue
Your low tops should be almost perfect for you on a rocky side hill...


And therein lies the rub. What's best for your uses usually won't be best for mine.

smokepole;
Top of the morning to you once more sir, I hope the day's behaving down in Colorado for you all and you're well.

Indeed that is always the rub isn't it?

When we're comparing notes, it's tough to articulate all the variables.

Little canyon on the mountain behind the house for instance.

[Linked Image]

If we're hunting deer and it bails off the grassy section and drops off the cliffs into the rocks below, our day just got a tad more complicated and gear selection changed or might could do anyways.

Personally my tall Meindl boots sit behind the pickup seat complete with fresh sets of socks so at very least when I get back to it with the first load I can change it up if need be.

Oh, we hunt moose up on the grass too and if a bull did a death run over the edge, our plan is to move down to the carcass for a couple days and make jerky out of the entire thing... laugh

Best to you all this Easter.

Dwayne


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If your dumb enough to shoot anything bigger than a Cotton Tail, on the edge of that Canyon, forget the Boots, take some match's and build a fire and eat the critter down there. the hell with packing it out.I've never been that hungry or Dumb. Rio7

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