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#7769254 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: Kenneth]  
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broomd Offline
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broomd  Offline
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Idaho
Originally Posted by Kenneth
Originally Posted by broomd


Gold bond has a strong odor, I'd leave that [bleep] at home.

No disrepect, but after several days of climbing mountains in August, you will have a funk that no will stand downwind of you, and you're saying Goldbond has an odor, TFF..Are you planning on approaching game from upwind?



Check with your guide; he'll very likely have a rangefinder, if not, take one. I missed my first ram without one years ago and swore I'd never sheep or goat hunt without one again. It's been 100% success since.


I don't care what the guide says,You take your own. He loses his, batterys die, etc etc...This simple lesson cost me thousands of dollars.



Nothing personal, just difference of opinion.


Point taken, Ken. You're right about the RF. I've not used a guide; indeed, I'd take my own with what you've said.
We disagree about the Gold Bond.
That's the joy of freedom of choice with our gear and hunts.


Originally Posted by Sitka deer

Another of AOD's finest...

Laughing here!


Thank you Sitka.
I consider that a badge of honor, the proof is in the DIY harvest success. Wanna talk about that?

And anymore I have zero to do with AOD and seldom frequent there; but that said, there is lots of good info to be had there.
O.P.--it's absolutely worth a posting there to add to what you garnish here.

And Sitka, if you find my posting that funny, you need a L I F E and some joy, dude.

CMG 300 BP

#7769333 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 32,727
Sitka deer Offline
Campfire Oracle
Sitka deer  Offline
Campfire Oracle

Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 32,727
Anchorage, AK USA
Disabusing you of your fantasies is the least of my concerns.

You could answer your own questions with a search right here, though.


Mark Begich, Joaquin Jackson, and Heller resistance... Three huge reasons to worry about the NRA.
#7769726 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: bloodworks]  
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Sitka deer Offline
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Sitka deer  Offline
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Anchorage, AK USA
Originally Posted by bloodworks
I'd use a loaner rifle long before I would a loaner pack. Bad idea.


Just reread this and have to say there is a lot more sense in it than just about anything else posted.


Mark Begich, Joaquin Jackson, and Heller resistance... Three huge reasons to worry about the NRA.
#7769862 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 32,727
Sitka deer Offline
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Sitka deer  Offline
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Anchorage, AK USA
Originally Posted by broomd

I've been blessed with a room-full of DIY rams (dall and others), I'm sure others have too, but here are my thoughts after years of trial and error...

Take the hiking sticks. I question the sanity of anyone who doesn't use them. Use anti-shock. Between my friends and I several of us experience instant wrist problems if we don't use the anti-shock spring-loaded style.

Do NOT take moth balls into the pristine wilds. That poison has no business on a sheep hunt! A few drops of pine sol may work fine to deter bears, I dunno.

Try your friends backpack out. Wear it with weight, train with it.
Take it to a reputable outdoor shop, if they fit it to you and it feels great, use it. Save the $600 guys are giving way for a Kifaru. If it won't work, bite the bullet or ask your guide for his take. He might have one.

Take the fly rod. If your guide says leave it behind with your flying (travel) clothes, leave it behind. Better to be prepared for some great grayling fishing than wish you had it.
I lived in AK and have had my chance to catch the helloutta them, so I wouldn't bring it myself. If you've never caught them? Bring it and hope for an opportunity.

Don't use an antiperspirant anything. That seems like a no-brainer to anyone who is health minded, but clogging your armpit pores, feet etc. is stupidity, imho.
You sweat for a reason. Wear good socks to wick moisture.
For your pits, buy a scent-free all-natural deodorant like Tom's of Maine and cut the deo stick out of it and put it in a zip lock. Use as needed. Gold bond has a strong odor, I'd leave that [bleep] at home.

Take the .308 and the Leupy. If, like you said, you have a good bear load for it, use that gun for both species with confidence.

Check with your guide; he'll very likely have a rangefinder, if not, take one. I missed my first ram without one years ago and swore I'd never sheep or goat hunt without one again. It's been 100% success since.

Leave the gaiters off the sheep mountain. They are just more weight and constriction and aren't necessary. I never use them either way, but I guess for bear country they'd be justified.
Break your boots in well. Train with them.
Don't forget the second skin, or moleskin, for rare blisters or rub spots. If your feet heat up, take the time to air them out properly.

Hope this helps. This advice has come from years of both mistakes and success--all DIY.




Just had two calls from friends that insisted people would not understand just how freaking stupid and clueless your points are unless I point them out clearly. Fortunately for you I can only type slowly, so you may be able to follow the points...

Roomful... kind of an interesting number, but I killed DIY sheep 14 years in a row. I have killed others. I have guided sheep hunters. I suspect my hands have been in an order of magnitude more sheep guts than you have seen.

I hear the limp-of-wrist benefit from braces... I would not know as the dozens and dozens of folks I have been with in the mountains have never been afflicted with your curse. I do not know anyone that has used the "anti-shock" AKA gay version of walking sticks.

Your Greenpeace attitudes are duly noted on moth balls and Pine Sol and can only laugh about them. You said it better than I could, obviously.

Where did the OP mention borrowing a friend's pack? I missed that along with everyone else with a scintilla of reading comprehension.

"Reputable outdoor shop" for adjusting? Taking a mythical pack to a mythical shop for a pimply-faced summer hire to adjust simply strikes me as really special. YMMV

Now you get back to borrowing from the guide without mentioning how he should train with it.

Finally!! Here is a single sentence that makes sense! It is a defensible argument on bringing the rod. Congratulations! You made sense for 33 whole words! I do not agree, but accept the fact you might be right under the conditions that will exist on the ground in August. This will be your only positive note... Do not let it go to your head.

Antiperspirant has been tested for decades and is not a health issue... period. Even if it were a long-term health issue you would not be looking at long-term issues with a single hunt and run-up to the hunt to help control the single most critical issue in the entire hunt; bad feet.

Antiperspirant works and works well. Anyone that denies that and admits they have never used it deserves every last word of derision possible. Especially when your absolute stupidity might lead someone away from it that could really use it. You show a clear lack of experience in the importance of conrolling wet feet, especially on others. The OP early on realized how important Ironbender's post was and will probably use it and benefit greatly from it. That would be without thanks to you...

And just where did you pull the armpit comment from? No one suggested it was to control anything other than excess foot perspiration. Prejuidicing an important point with noise generated from sheer stupidity is really something to be proud of. Congratulations!

Whoooooopsss! You may have made sense on two points! The 308 will work fine. Who would have thought there would be two positive points??? Amazing!

My rangefinder goes with me every hunt, every time... If there is ever a problem it is only on me. And I even change batteries before every major event. They are too cheap to ignore.

Just exactly what does your cluelessness think gaiters are for? Yes for bear hunts but no for sheep??? I would hate to have to pay your "recreational" reality bills! Gaiters are the single most important thing to protect your boot laces and uppers in scree and shale slides... That one of your professed outdoorsman status has not seen that despite a "roomful" of DIY trophies is at best comical. Or Pathetic... your call.

Rare blisters? More laughing...

Airing out boots and feet? What happens when they swell like EVERY over-heated foot does when you take that boot off?

Have you ever really left the house?

Congrats, I think you would score 100% on the AOD scale despite two not-quite-wrong points!

Only problem is deciding between laughing and crying...


Mark Begich, Joaquin Jackson, and Heller resistance... Three huge reasons to worry about the NRA.
#7769940 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
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alaska_lanche Offline
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alaska_lanche  Offline
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Wasilla, Alaska
Broomd,

Why do you like the anti-shocks...I bought a pair a couple years ago cause they were actually cheaper than the standard ones and after using both I prefer teh standards...lighter weight and I really don't see or feel what the antishocks do for ya.

Just curious what you like about them.

Thanks

Alpha

#7769944 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: Sitka deer]  
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 4,831
broomd Offline
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broomd  Offline
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Joined: May 2011
Posts: 4,831
Idaho
Originally Posted by Sitka deer
Originally Posted by broomd

I've been blessed with a room-full of DIY rams (dall and others), I'm sure others have too, but here are my thoughts after years of trial and error...

Take the hiking sticks. I question the sanity of anyone who doesn't use them. Use anti-shock. Between my friends and I several of us experience instant wrist problems if we don't use the anti-shock spring-loaded style.

Do NOT take moth balls into the pristine wilds. That poison has no business on a sheep hunt! A few drops of pine sol may work fine to deter bears, I dunno.

Try your friends backpack out. Wear it with weight, train with it.
Take it to a reputable outdoor shop, if they fit it to you and it feels great, use it. Save the $600 guys are giving way for a Kifaru. If it won't work, bite the bullet or ask your guide for his take. He might have one.

Take the fly rod. If your guide says leave it behind with your flying (travel) clothes, leave it behind. Better to be prepared for some great grayling fishing than wish you had it.
I lived in AK and have had my chance to catch the helloutta them, so I wouldn't bring it myself. If you've never caught them? Bring it and hope for an opportunity.

Don't use an antiperspirant anything. That seems like a no-brainer to anyone who is health minded, but clogging your armpit pores, feet etc. is stupidity, imho.
You sweat for a reason. Wear good socks to wick moisture.
For your pits, buy a scent-free all-natural deodorant like Tom's of Maine and cut the deo stick out of it and put it in a zip lock. Use as needed. Gold bond has a strong odor, I'd leave that [bleep] at home.

Take the .308 and the Leupy. If, like you said, you have a good bear load for it, use that gun for both species with confidence.

Check with your guide; he'll very likely have a rangefinder, if not, take one. I missed my first ram without one years ago and swore I'd never sheep or goat hunt without one again. It's been 100% success since.

Leave the gaiters off the sheep mountain. They are just more weight and constriction and aren't necessary. I never use them either way, but I guess for bear country they'd be justified.
Break your boots in well. Train with them.
Don't forget the second skin, or moleskin, for rare blisters or rub spots. If your feet heat up, take the time to air them out properly.

Hope this helps. This advice has come from years of both mistakes and success--all DIY.




Just had two calls from friends that insisted people would not understand just how freaking stupid and clueless your points are unless I point them out clearly. Fortunately for you I can only type slowly, so you may be able to follow the points...

Roomful... kind of an interesting number, but I killed DIY sheep 14 years in a row. I have killed others. I have guided sheep hunters. I suspect my hands have been in an order of magnitude more sheep guts than you have seen.

I hear the limp-of-wrist benefit from braces... I would not know as the dozens and dozens of folks I have been with in the mountains have never been afflicted with your curse. I do not know anyone that has used the "anti-shock" AKA gay version of walking sticks.

Your Greenpeace attitudes are duly noted on moth balls and Pine Sol and can only laugh about them. You said it better than I could, obviously.

Where did the OP mention borrowing a friend's pack? I missed that along with everyone else with a scintilla of reading comprehension.

"Reputable outdoor shop" for adjusting? Taking a mythical pack to a mythical shop for a pimply-faced summer hire to adjust simply strikes me as really special. YMMV

Now you get back to borrowing from the guide without mentioning how he should train with it.

Finally!! Here is a single sentence that makes sense! It is a defensible argument on bringing the rod. Congratulations! You made sense for 33 whole words! I do not agree, but accept the fact you might be right under the conditions that will exist on the ground in August. This will be your only positive note... Do not let it go to your head.

Antiperspirant has been tested for decades and is not a health issue... period. Even if it were a long-term health issue you would not be looking at long-term issues with a single hunt and run-up to the hunt to help control the single most critical issue in the entire hunt; bad feet.

Antiperspirant works and works well. Anyone that denies that and admits they have never used it deserves every last word of derision possible. Especially when your absolute stupidity might lead someone away from it that could really use it. You show a clear lack of experience in the importance of conrolling wet feet, especially on others. The OP early on realized how important Ironbender's post was and will probably use it and benefit greatly from it. That would be without thanks to you...

And just where did you pull the armpit comment from? No one suggested it was to control anything other than excess foot perspiration. Prejuidicing an important point with noise generated from sheer stupidity is really something to be proud of. Congratulations!

Whoooooopsss! You may have made sense on two points! The 308 will work fine. Who would have thought there would be two positive points??? Amazing!

My rangefinder goes with me every hunt, every time... If there is ever a problem it is only on me. And I even change batteries before every major event. They are too cheap to ignore.

Just exactly what does your cluelessness think gaiters are for? Yes for bear hunts but no for sheep??? I would hate to have to pay your "recreational" reality bills! Gaiters are the single most important thing to protect your boot laces and uppers in scree and shale slides... That one of your professed outdoorsman status has not seen that despite a "roomful" of DIY trophies is at best comical. Or Pathetic... your call.

Rare blisters? More laughing...

Airing out boots and feet? What happens when they swell like EVERY over-heated foot does when you take that boot off?

Have you ever really left the house?

Congrats, I think you would score 100% on the AOD scale despite two not-quite-wrong points!

Only problem is deciding between laughing and crying...



Writing a post of that length just for me? You need a life or hobby or both. (I read the first and last sentence--took awhile to scroll) means I really got under your paper-thin skin.
Love it!

Kenneth disagreed with some of my points, but he oozed class. That's what adults do.

You? Ad hominem first post followed by page-length whine.

#7769948 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 32,727
Sitka deer Offline
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Sitka deer  Offline
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Posts: 32,727
Anchorage, AK USA
Best and only move you have considering you have nothing worth reading to add...


Mark Begich, Joaquin Jackson, and Heller resistance... Three huge reasons to worry about the NRA.
#7769962 - 05/26/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: alaska_lanche]  
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Posts: 4,831
broomd Offline
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broomd  Offline
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Idaho
Originally Posted by alaska_lanche
Broomd,

Why do you like the anti-shocks...I bought a pair a couple years ago cause they were actually cheaper than the standard ones and after using both I prefer teh standards...lighter weight and I really don't see or feel what the antishocks do for ya.

Just curious what you like about them.

Thanks


Lanche,

I think some guys have wrists more prone to fubar than others. <me>. Then again 50 is rapidly approaching for me.
I started using anti-shocks in '01 and haven't looked
back--other than the year I used the fixed Black Diamonds.

The fixed were very light and had the nifty flick-lock, but I might have been too used to the spring loaded pole, I had wrist pain after using them for only a few hours.
I went back to the Lekis and have been fine.

I've talked to a couple guys who experienced the same thing.

Plus I like the spring action when leaning on the pole and climbing out of a low spot with a heavy pack.


#7770237 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Dec 2007
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BCJR Offline
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BCJR  Offline
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A.K. SE
take what your guide says to take and he will realize that you can read and listen and wont treat you like an idiot for the rest of your trip smile

#7770790 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: BCJR]  
Joined: Dec 2005
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waterrat Offline
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waterrat  Offline
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Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 937
Lake Iliamna Alaska
Originally Posted by BCJR
take what your guide says to take and he will realize that you can read and listen and wont treat you like an idiot for the rest of your trip smile


The best advice yet!


I tend to use more than enough gun
Bravo

#7770800 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: BCJR]  
Joined: Jul 2001
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Bear_in_Fairbanks Offline
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Bear_in_Fairbanks  Offline
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Posts: 1,418
Fairbanks, Ak.
Originally Posted by BCJR
take what your guide says to take and he will realize that you can read and listen and wont treat you like an idiot for the rest of your trip smile


Now that right there makes the most sense of anything "contributed" so far. Pay attention here.
Bear in Fairbanks


"Unless you're the lead dog, the scenery never changes."
Amazingly, I've lived long enough to see a President who is worse than Carter.
And finally,
Gun control means using two hands.

#7770876 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: Bear_in_Fairbanks]  
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Kenneth Offline
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Kenneth  Offline
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Edge of the map
ya wanna know why, I didn't have my range finder with me at the time I really needed it?

Cause the Guide said, I should leave mine at basecamp,has he always has his,

Guides make mistakes every day, just like you and I....

#7771278 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: Kenneth]  
Joined: May 2011
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broomd Offline
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broomd  Offline
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Idaho
Originally Posted by Kenneth
ya wanna know why, I didn't have my range finder with me at the time I really needed it?

Cause the Guide said, I should leave mine at basecamp, has he always has his,

Guides make mistakes every day, just like you and I....


Yep. Guides are just people and make mistakes and forget things too.

Although, it would be interesting to see what guides put on the b!tch list about clients.
A 'guess' list...
1. Out of shape/lazy
2. Know-it-alls. 3. Unprepared gear-wise 4. Unrealistic expectations.

I haven't a clue, but would like to know.




#7771300 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Jan 2005
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rost495 Offline
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rost495  Offline
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La Grange, TX
I'll never be without my own rangefinder. And my own GPS.

Be in shape. Carry some of your own personal survival gear. Make sure there is commo IE SPOT or Sat phone at camp.

The guide can die out in the field leaving you for yourself.

Beyond that I defer to the guide. My only other issue being guided, I feel that generally it shoudl be up to the hunter to pick his clothing, IE combos that work for him. If he doesn't know then defer to suggestions.

What I'd expect out of a hunter... be in shape. Be able to shoot. Dont' expect the largest one out there, though we'll try, but be ready to accept nothing. And enjoy the experience. Offer to pitch in where you can. It may be refused but offer anyway.


We can keep Larry Root and all his idiotic blabber and user names on here, but we can't get Ralph back..... Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over....
#7771496 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: Yakataga]  
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docdb Offline
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I've been on four guided Dall hunts and Lord willing will go again in 2014 (Brooks). I have to agree on the lower power scope. Last year after the stalk, we set up on a group of rams at about 200 yards. I had the scope maxed out on 15X, could count the hairs...
Anyway, as I was waiting for the perfect shot to line up, the guide and I were discussing the qualities of the two larger rams, and which one to take. It then occurred to me that if all the rams ran at the shot, I might not be able to follow the chosen one for a follow up shot at 15X. I twisted down to what felt right (6X) and bang flop no worries.
I now have a Leupold 2.5-8X on the sheep rifle.
Also, Lowa makes a good boot, I'd suggest logging about 50 miles in up, down terrain.
Don

#7771672 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: docdb]  
Joined: Mar 2004
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kutenay Offline
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kutenay  Offline
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I have never hunted in Alaska, but, have spent quite some time in northern BC, hunting and other stuff as well as having lived for periods of three straight months alone on top of a mountain, right on the BC-AK border. I also have backpacked for work and recreation since spring 1964, all over BC and some of Alberta.

So, I would suggest.

1. Poles, I have Komperdell C3s and Black Diamond Carbon whatevers, their top model. I tried Lekies, do not care for anti-shock, some do some don't--I prefer the BDs to any others I have tried.

2. Gaiters, I have several different pairs for different uses and do not go into the mountains without at least one pair. I am buying others to try, as these are a crucial part of MY clothing.

3. Range finder....I AM buying one, just put this off as I have not been able to hunt much for three years as my wife was very ill and my partner has one. BUT, I definitely consider them VERY worthwhile and, btw, I am a former wilderness worker whose job entailed judging distances quickly and am good at it, still, a Leica 12 or 1600 is in MY future.

4. Wet feet KILL a trip, USE the anti-perspirant, have spare socks, change 2-3 times per day and I like Gold Bond Foot Powder plus I prefer plastic bandaids, the large ones covered by fabric Elastplast over moleskin AND I bandage instantly when I feel a "hot spot".

5. Listen to SD on footwear and gloves,he is right and while beeswax is a lot of work to do right and many boots cannot be so treated as you dare not heat them due to plastic heel counters, so use Obenauf's OP, the beeswax is better than ANY other H2O proofing for all leather boots.

6. I NEVER go ANYWHERE, even with a companion, without a very light emergency camp, would have my own GPS and BUY YOUR OWN DECENT pack, as most in gear stores know jackschit about pack fitting, especially for hunting loads.

Last, yappy old geezer that I am, I use 1.75x6. 2.5x8 Leupies, 3x9-Z3 Swaros and 3x9 Conquests on my lighter rifles and I find the Leupies as good as you will ever need in the mountains and LIGHTER than the somewhat optically better Conquests-I don't like the more costly Swaro and won't buy another.

The final suggestion, most crucial for we OLD guys, get into the best shape of your life and then improve that, this really makes the difference.......and, use the .308!

HTH, and may I offer you the very best of luck on your hunt smile

#7771673 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: docdb]  
Joined: Jun 2002
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bearstalker Offline
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bearstalker  Offline
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Posts: 9,921
Alaska
What's the census on plastic boots? And what style on crampons you guys prefer?

#7771773 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: kutenay]  
Joined: May 2011
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broomd Offline
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broomd  Offline
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Idaho
Originally Posted by kutenay


6. I NEVER go ANYWHERE, even with a companion, without a very light emergency camp,


No argument with that point.

Remember quite well back to 2002 when son got his first dall (at last light on opening day).
We were four miles from base in rough jagged country and had no emergency camp (we only going to "walk/scout down the ridge before turning in for the night"--yeah right). Yards turned into miles.
It was a long, cold night of shivering and jumping jacks over that dead sheep.
Lesson learned.


We had little cover and used whites to fool that wary ram.

Best of luck HTH.

[Linked Image]

#7772021 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: broomd]  
Joined: Sep 2003
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Calvin Offline
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Calvin  Offline
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Posts: 17,792
Craig, AK
Guided hunt? Who cares what you bring... If the guide is worth anything, he'll put you a on legal ram, despite how unprepared you are.


Fully Guided Salmon and Halibut Charters
www.alaskawideopen.com
#7772145 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: bearstalker]  
Joined: Mar 2006
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kaboku68 Offline
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kaboku68  Offline
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Alaska
Originally Posted by bearstalker
What's the census on plastic boots? And what style on crampons you guys prefer?


I don't like them. Its not that they are hard on the knees when you have a heavy load coming down the mountain or that they make your feet sweat when its hot. I believe that if you take a pair of boots that you are going to use and then get them wet with your sock choice and then "walk them dry" that they work to form fit to your feet. Plastics like the Scarpa seem to fail to fit as well.

I used to run instep crampons but I have since moved to BD Cyborgs. They are a bit spendy but they just chew up ice and talus.

I also like OR Croc gaiters better than Kennetreks.

I switch between Hanwag Trapper GTX and Kennetrek Mountain Extreme 400s. Both fit my feet right. However, you can learn how to tie boots for various loads and that is an important thing as well.

SD or Broomd may not know who Fred Rungee was but Fred always lived alone in very bad grizzly country. Fred was Dunc Gilchrist's best bud for a long time when they both worked for the Forest Service. Fred was attacked three different times and chewed on twice. He is still alive at 96 years old and while he has a cabin at Duffy's Roadhouse he still gets back up to his cabin and homestead on Lake Lorraine 3 miles off of the road where he has lived for 50 years. Fred got me on to moth balls. I would take just a couple in a ziplock bag and place them under the corners. I have not had my camp raided or my foodstuffs plundered for many years.
I also talked about mothballs with Ed Stevenson who still guides up Sheep River in the Talkeetnas and is probably the only guide alive who has been mauled by brownies twice. He agrees with me on the mothballs. I still go up into some of the rugged country and will go again this year. I teach school and those in Alaska know that it sucks for hunting. School starts on August 10th. Some genius came up with that.

I will still fly into that glacial space until Gary Green retires and then I will have to take a boat up there. I am only a couple of years away from retirement and then I can do 30 day hunts up Anderson and Walsh.
This may not mean anything to you and that is fine.

I have no ego but just try to help.

sincerely,
Thomas

#7772364 - 05/27/13 Re: Alaska Range Sheep Hunt August 10th---MUST HAVES [Re: kaboku68]  
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,921
bearstalker Offline
Campfire Outfitter
bearstalker  Offline
Campfire Outfitter

Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 9,921
Alaska
Thomas,

I sent you a pm.

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