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#7218240 - 12/23/12 05:54 AM Arrow Length
Dingmo Offline
Member

Registered: 05/14/12
Posts: 238
Loc: Central Iowa
Pretty new to bow hunting, why are arrows cut to a certain length?

I don't have a cut off saw. Can I just use them right out of the box? What would be the result?

Thanks!

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CI16728
#7284710 - 01/08/13 08:01 AM Re: Arrow Length [Re: Dingmo]
centershot Offline
Campfire Ranger

Registered: 08/02/05
Posts: 2375
Loc: Southern Idaho
Several reasons, length effects spine or the amount the arrow flexes when shot. Weight, lighter = faster. And convenience, long arrows are in the way more. All that said, be sure to not cut them too short, keeping that broadhead away from your hand is a good thing.

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#7285736 - 01/08/13 12:14 PM Re: Arrow Length [Re: centershot]
AH64guy Online   content
Campfire Ranger

Registered: 05/16/09
Posts: 1810
Loc: North VA
Result would be a arrow heavier than needed, loss of some speed, and potentail tuning issues from the arrow length and the extra mass trying to flex.

If you are a 30 inch draw, shooting a 32 inch shaft, minumal. If you are a 26 draw, probably more tuning issues.

Most archery shops/box-store retailers will cut arrows for $1-$3 a shaft and glue your inserts in for you.

What Centershot said: if the arrow and broadhead fall off of the back of the arrow rest, it gets dicey trying to let down, not cut yourself, not cut a string/cable, or anything else you don't wanted to...kinda like this...



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#7286622 - 01/08/13 04:04 PM Re: Arrow Length [Re: AH64guy]
fat_daddy Offline
Campfire Regular

Registered: 01/07/12
Posts: 1040
Loc: east tennessee
eek that pic looks painfull
_________________________
Originally Posted By: deflave
Get your dick out of that rooster and go to church.

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#7287973 - 01/08/13 08:58 PM Re: Arrow Length [Re: fat_daddy]
krp Offline
Campfire Outfitter

Registered: 01/04/05
Posts: 9303
There are three spine factors in any given arrow... length, head weight and energy.

Once one is locked in then the other two are the only way to tune spine, once two are chosen then it leaves only one.

There's no problem with keeping a shaft at 32'' instead of say, 28''... Just use head weight and energy(poundage) to achieve optimum spine.

Charts for any length just get you in the ballpark... tuning for optimum spine is how you tune a bow.

Kent

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#7288167 - 01/08/13 10:44 PM Re: Arrow Length [Re: krp]
ranger1 Offline
Campfire Guide

Registered: 11/14/03
Posts: 4150
Loc: Central Montana
Spine of the actual arrow is the fourth. One needs to purchase an arrow that will be condusive to shooting well with the draw length, head weight, and poundage that one plans to shoot and tune from there using the 3 remaining factors. First, determine the length of arrow that best fits your set-up (I like just over an inch in front of the rest). Then determine the draw weight of your bow (it's best to start near or at max for your bow). Choose the weight of broadhead that you will use (100 gr. is generally the standard today). Now you begin to tune the bow to your arrow by moving the rest laterally and adjusting the draw weight to achieve perfect paper tuning flight. There is no reason to have an arrow protruding 6" in front of your rest. Set things up right the first time and you won't have to fight with your bow so much.

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#7288931 - 01/09/13 07:20 AM Re: Arrow Length [Re: ranger1]
krp Offline
Campfire Outfitter

Registered: 01/04/05
Posts: 9303
That's why I said of any given arrow... once the length is chosen and the insert set, so is the spine.

The reason charting only gets you in the ball park is there's a 3 to 4 inch cut range for most arrows... example, a pse 300 is charted 27 to 30 inches at 70 lbs.

Another reason is a 70 lb PSE Omen and a 70 lb Pse Bow maddness are not even close to putting the same energy down the same shaft.

If the proshop guy screws on a 100 grain head and hands you the arrow to shoot in both bows... theoretically it could be overspined for the bow maddness and underspined for the omen.

All of which only mean, most tuning issues aren't mechanical ie. rest, nock, shelf, timing ect... most tuning issues are spine issues... which may mean the arrow is coming out osculating sideways or up and down so bad they are hitting on parts of the bow.

I've often thought about using arrow length to tune spine if I wanted to set a bow at a specific poundage and a specific head weight... but the trial and error would get expensive fast... LOL

But to the OPs question... there's no reason you can't leave an arrow at 32 inches. Positives could be a heavier arrow with a lower spine for lower poundage and more KE.

Kent

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#7290260 - 01/09/13 12:51 PM Re: Arrow Length [Re: Dingmo]
elkhunter130 Offline
Campfire Regular

Registered: 10/28/05
Posts: 444
Loc: Grants Pass, Oregon
The one thing no one has mentioned yet is that longer arrows fly more forgiving. What I mean is that if form is not perfect(and form is hardly perfect) the shorter arrows tend to follow off the path easier than longer arrows out of the same bow. Spine is very important but setting the most forgiving spine is what I look for in tuning and arrow selection.

When I am setting up a new bow I try several different top manufactures of arrows and even different arrows by the same manufactures to see where the sweet spot is for that bow.

Over the years that has gotten a lot better and easier because the equipment is so well designed now but it still makes good sense.

Coming in from the field and doing some target archery really shows you the accuracy issues with a hunting bow.

All of this is amplified when you screw on a broadhead.

I have shot long heavy arrows well, I have shot short light arrows, and I have shot the arrows somewhere in between. In my experience heavier longer arrows just fly better.

Where I have settled lately for my Z7 is a 425g arrow at 28"'s with a one hundred grain broadhead. The spine charts show that for my setup I am somewhere between the .400 spine and the .340 spine. My bow likes the .400 Easton Axis. That leaves the BH about square with my riser for length.

That is just what this bow happens to like. There may be other combos that work and I suppose you could spend a lot of time and energy looking but...

I have been told that a little heavier spined arrow throws broadheads better, I will leave that up to others to decide.
_________________________
"A .358 Norma Mag is not for everyone but then again Bear hunting isn't either."

Unknown Bear guide on the Kodiak coast

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#7307194 - 01/13/13 10:27 AM Re: Arrow Length [Re: elkhunter130]
Firestorm Offline
New Member

Registered: 01/11/13
Posts: 7
Originally Posted By: elkhunter130
The one thing no one has mentioned yet is that longer arrows fly more forgiving. What I mean is that if form is not perfect(and form is hardly perfect) the shorter arrows tend to follow off the path easier than longer arrows out of the same bow. Spine is very important but setting the most forgiving spine is what I look for in tuning and arrow selection.

When I am setting up a new bow I try several different top manufactures of arrows and even different arrows by the same manufactures to see where the sweet spot is for that bow.

Over the years that has gotten a lot better and easier because the equipment is so well designed now but it still makes good sense.

Coming in from the field and doing some target archery really shows you the accuracy issues with a hunting bow.

All of this is amplified when you screw on a broadhead.

I have shot long heavy arrows well, I have shot short light arrows, and I have shot the arrows somewhere in between. In my experience heavier longer arrows just fly better.

Where I have settled lately for my Z7 is a 425g arrow at 28"'s with a one hundred grain broadhead. The spine charts show that for my setup I am somewhere between the .400 spine and the .340 spine. My bow likes the .400 Easton Axis. That leaves the BH about square with my riser for length.

That is just what this bow happens to like. There may be other combos that work and I suppose you could spend a lot of time and energy looking but...

I have been told that a little heavier spined arrow throws broadheads better, I will leave that up to others to decide.


Great discussion on what a bow likes and doesn't like for arrow length and spine. The OP may also want to look at a kinetic energy chart to see what their bow will produce with a specific arrow and length (weight).

I'm just over in Medford (ElkHunter130 neighbor)and just picking up a used (new to me) Z7X. ( I use a ground blind so got the shorter axle bow) Just waiting for the correct draw length cam. I am contemplating using my 400 Beemans ICS Hunters in it to try it in a 62lb draw weight config. I may end up having to go to 340's. The truth will be in the shooting.

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