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#12148491 - 07/15/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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I have Interlocks and Interbonds, have not used either on animals. Am working up loads, will be shooting both.

How do those two compare?

DF

CMG 300 BP

#12148533 - 07/15/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Dirtfarmer]  
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Originally Posted by Dirtfarmer
I have Interlocks and Interbonds, have not used either on animals. Am working up loads, will be shooting both.

How do those two compare?

DF


I've used both on game at '06 velocities, and found them indistinguishable.

FC

#12148779 - 07/15/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: szihn]  
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Steve,

Based on conversations with a number of bullet makers, plus some testing of core hardness, MOST manufacturers of swaged, jacketed rifle bullets use a significant amount of antimony in their core lead. In fact the average percentage is similar to that in most "chilled" shot, about 3-4%, but can vary from 2.5% to 6% depending on the specific bullet. Some companies, in fact, often tweak the percentage of antimony, due to performance reports, accuracy, etc. In fact, back before Hornady developed the Interlock jacket-ring, their Spire Points had a better reputation for penetration than some other cup-and-cores, and I later found out that their big game bullets had a higher-than-average percentage of antimony in the cores than most other brands.


John

"Gunwriters, as you know, aren't as informed as their readers are and if it wasn't for the readers, there would be no need for writers..."--Shrapnel, May 2015
#12148912 - 07/15/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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From reading the replies it seems that interlock generates mainly positive feedback. On more than one occasion though, I've heard "they work well at 30-06 velocities".
My question is how do they work on elk sized game at .30 magnum velocities?
I shoot a .300 Weatherby and I'm currently using Hornady factory ammo that's loaded with the 180gr Interlock projectile at a reported 3140fps - but my brutally honest chronograph suggests that they're doing a fraction over 3000fps.
Is this too fast for the 180gr Interlock on elk sized game?

Cheers,

Russ.


You'll probably never NEED a gun. In fact I hope you never do. BUT IF you do, you will probably need it worse than anything you've ever needed before in your life...
#12149059 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: BadboyMelvin]  
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Originally Posted by BadboyMelvin

From reading the replies it seems that interlock generates mainly positive feedback. On more than one occasion though, I've heard "they work well at 30-06 velocities".
My question is how do they work on elk sized game at .30 magnum velocities?
I shoot a .300 Weatherby and I'm currently using Hornady factory ammo that's loaded with the 180gr Interlock projectile at a reported 3140fps - but my brutally honest chronograph suggests that they're doing a fraction over 3000fps.
Is this too fast for the 180gr Interlock on elk sized game?

Cheers,

Russ.


Here's your thread (and only 2 years old, too!)


FWIW, here's what Hornady has to say:

Originally Posted by Hornday's Website
InterLock® (RN, SP, SP-RP, FP, HP)
The aerodynamic secant ogive of the Hornady InterLock® delivers flat trajectories and great accuracy. It's tapered jacket allows for deep penetration and controlled expansion while the InterLock ring locks core and jacket together.
More about InterLock Rifle products...
More about InterLock Handgun products...

Controlled expansion with deep penetration.
Recommended muzzle velocity range: 2000 to 3300 fps


FC

Alpha

#12149098 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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Hi John.
That's interesting. Antimony is found in most of the core metal fro most manufacturers, but 6% surprises me. I would have guessed it to be around 3.5%. I have been out of the bullet making business now since 2000, so some changes have probably been made in the last 17 years. I have a 1973 copy of Hornady's manual and their interlock bullets were all through it, but now I hear the lead cores are not the dame alloy as they were in the early 70s. I bought many thousands of the interlocks in the 70s, but I never tried to test their alloy back then, so I can only guess what the changes are that Hornady made from 1973 to today.

I do remember when Speer first brought out it's Grand Slam line, and the rear core was at 6.5%, but that was later changed. I suspect the whole core was then made with a high-antimony content. But what alloy I have no idea.

In eutectic lead based alloys the addition of antimony brings the hardness up but also the brittleness, so I would not think it wise to go above 6% ever in a rifle bullet. The addition of Tin can buffer that brittleness a small amount, but Tin actually is not for hardening as most men think. What Tin does it to make the alloy flow easier. In casting it acts as soap does to water. It makes the molten lead flow far easier and fill out the molds. In the process of swedging Tin adds a lubricity to the lead wire to make it form better. There is a down side however, in that tin can also cause the core to be slippery enough to make them more prone to jump their jackets on impact too.
Speer tried to solve that problem with it's "Hot-Core" line, but it's largely ineffective because their jackets are not tinned on the inside and no flux is used to cause the molten lead to bond. Cost wise, it's probably not something they can do.
I have done the same thing on custom made bullets to see if it will work and it does work wonderfully. What i did in 1994 was to take some stip and tin one side with 50-50 Bar solder and slick it off with steel wool. That left only a wash coat of solder on one side of the metal. Next I formed the cups with the tinned side being inside and poured lead cores into the jackets. The jackets were set on a piece of 1-1/4" bar stock heated to 750 degrees so the lead cores would stay molten for a few minutes and bond to the solder on the inside of the jackets. I then swedged the ogives and made the bullets ready to load. What I didn't do was to taper the jackets towards the tip and that would have been a lot better, but my experiment worked pretty well anyway. The strip I used was .028" thick so it was not too think to open up.
When fired at velocities as low as 1450 FPS from a 30-30 they still expanded well enough that I would have hunted with them and at velocities as fast as 3100 FPS form a 300 Win Mag, they shed only about 15% of the weight and held together very well. They were not ideal because of the lack of a thicker jacket with a taper of that jacket to .006" at the tip, but even knowing they were not perfect, they did a lot better than most commercial bullets I tested them against.
The down side was time... Such bullets, made right are very time consuming and could not be done with existing machinery at any price people could afford to pay.
I believe the next giant step forward in bullet will probably follow this lead or this basic idea. Cup and core bullets with thick enough jackets and thin enough noses would be very good and if they were bonded they would be super good. What the industry needs to do is to invent machines that can do it accurately and cheap. Today the hunter has a better selection of bullets than any hunter has had before in all history, but the technology has not come full circle to a point that such a bullet can be made for the price we need it to be for the average teenager to shoot barrels out of his rifles as we had in the 60s and 70s. If some company (I hope Speer and Sierra are listening) can come up with the machines to make this bullet at the cost of a standard cup and core, or maybe even cheaper, they would revolutionize the industry. It can't be done..................yet.
Flying machines, accurate semi-auto rifles and lap-top computers could not be done either...........until they were.
I have hopes that the engineers of tomorrow can and will come up with such machinery. I did write to Sierra about this very thing, but never heard back.

#12149159 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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That process sounds like the root cause for a Bitterroot being so expensive and time consuming to make but danged they are good Bullets.


Semper Fi
#12149261 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: szihn]  
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Steve,

Yep, 3.5% is probably just about the average percentage of antimony in cup-and-core bullets. Amounts varying from that are for specialized uses--but some bullet-makers aren't convinced that 100% weight retention is the ideal.

There have been a number of relatively recent attempts to produce inexpensive cup-and-core bullets that consistently hold together. About 15 years ago Federal tried with the Deep Shok bullet, by making the jacket thicker in the middle of the shank section (as Remington implied Core-Lokts were made) in order to hold the rear 2/3 of the bullet together. They worked very well, but unfortunately turned out to be more expensive to make than they anticipated, the reason they only lasted a couple of years on the market. (Core-Lokts actually just had a thicker jacket along the shank, but it wasn't tapered to lock the core in. More recent Core-Lokts are pretty much basic cup-and-cores, with thinner jackets to reduce production costs, or sometimes actually Interlocks.) The only Deep Shok I ever managed to recover from a big game animal retained over 90% of its weight--but they were gone not long afterward.

Right now one technique that seems to hold the most promise for relatively inexpensive bullets that hold together is electro-plating the jacket around the lead core, the process used in Speer Gold Dot handgun bullets and Federal Fusion rifle bullets. However, Speer tried to make their DeepCurl rifle bullets (basically the same as Fusions) at the same price as Hot-Cors and also failed. The big trick is varying the thickness of the jacket to get exactly the taper desired. Fusions hold together but tend to expand very widely, probably due to a combination of relatively thin jackets and soft cores. And of course to make the jackets thicker, the electro-plating takes longer, one problem in cost of production.

I have run into a lot of hunters who think Hot-Cores are bonded bullets, and even one or two gun writers, but as you note they are not, which can be easily proven by putting one in a vise, nose-up, then hacksawing it down the middle. The jacket can be just as easily pried away from the core as with any swaged cup-and-core. I've had Hot-Cors completely separate jacket and core even on deer.


John

"Gunwriters, as you know, aren't as informed as their readers are and if it wasn't for the readers, there would be no need for writers..."--Shrapnel, May 2015
#12149715 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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Great thread.

#12149727 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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Bravo

#12149797 - 07/16/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: ringworm]  
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Alot is said in that post !


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#12151143 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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What seems to be the best loading depth from the rifling that works best for these bullets?

#12151255 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: JP_Lucas]  
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Originally Posted by JP_Lucas
What seems to be the best loading depth from the rifling that works best for these bullets?



Thats another plus for the interlock, really no seating depth to mess with, just seat them to the cannelure and call it good.


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#12152151 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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I've found they require the same work as any other bullet as to best seating depth. Sometimes, best depth may have the cannelure well above the top of the case neck.

#12152172 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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If seated to the cannelure, most commercial rounds will be about the SAAMI maximum overall length for that cartridge, which makes it simple if you don't want to experiment. But as lotech noted, they will often shoot noticeably more accurately after some experimentation with seating depth. In a number of the rounds I load for, the cannelure is well ahead of the case mouth in the rifle's most accurate load, even in long-time standard factory rounds.


John

"Gunwriters, as you know, aren't as informed as their readers are and if it wasn't for the readers, there would be no need for writers..."--Shrapnel, May 2015
#12152191 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: TomM1]  
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Originally Posted by TomM1

That's another plus for the interlock, really no seating depth to mess with, just seat them to the cannelure and call it good.


I have been surprised that ^^^^^^ has worked for me MORE than I expected. I have been surprised how many Xs the SAAMI 'overall
cartridge length' has worked very well.... HOWEVER....

I can assure you it's NOT always the case. ONE opposite example was my 1st XTR FTWT in 270 Win. The bullets had to be seated so deep that the case mouth was AT the break point of the S O (secant ogive). *** I despised the LOOK of the cartridge but it shot well.

OTOH - more than 1 or 2 rifles PREFERRED the bullet seated OUT beyond the cannelure.

By NO means am I trying contradict M D, it's just that every rifle has ITS preferences.

Jerry


jwall- *** 3100 guy***

Slow bullets don't impress me.

A Flat Trajectory is NEVER a handicap.


#12152230 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: jwall]  
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Interesting. My present .270, a new Model 70 Featherweight, likes 150 Interlocks seated with the cannelure about 1/8" in front of the case mouth.


John

"Gunwriters, as you know, aren't as informed as their readers are and if it wasn't for the readers, there would be no need for writers..."--Shrapnel, May 2015
#12152297 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Mule Deer]  
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Originally Posted by Mule Deer
Interesting. My present .270, a new Model 70 Featherweight, likes 150 Interlocks seated with the cannelure about 1/8" in front of the case mouth.


MD - That XTR FTWT was the First one in Hammond LA. I ordered it thru a local dealer...so @ 1982 ? They had just been introduced in the Fall 1981 Win catalog.

The loaded round looked like a bird's beak sticking out from the case mouth. That's the only rifle I EVER had like that.
I LOVED the rifle but hated the look of the cartridge.

Jerry


jwall- *** 3100 guy***

Slow bullets don't impress me.

A Flat Trajectory is NEVER a handicap.


#12152306 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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Ive had good luck getting them to shoot in the calibers Ive tried (270, 7mm, 30, 35, and 375) by just seating them to the cannelure. Im sure seating them for a .010" jump might shrink groups a bit, just never felt the need. Makes it easy to use ammo from one rifle in another of the same chambering.

Only ones that seemed a fit "finnicky" were the 139 and 154 gr bullets in a couple 280's. IIRC switching powders eliminated the finnicky-ness 😀


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#12152397 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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I like them so much that now when I get a hunting rifle chambered I give the Smith a factory Hornaday round to set the throat for if they are available. This makes it easy to seat the bullets at the cannelure and if I ever have to resort to store bought ammo that issue is taken care of too. All the other bullets will have to find their own seating depth which is always the case so nothing lost there either. Voila Cave man simple like I like it.


"When you disarm the people, you commence to offend them and show that you distrust them either through cowardice or lack of confidence, and both of these opinions generate hatred." Niccolo Machiavelli
#12152586 - 07/17/17 Re: Tell me about the Hornady Interlock SP [Re: Trystan]  
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colorado bob Offline
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Just used a 270 grain interlock out of my 375 Ruger. Grizzly bear went @ 30 yards & piled up. Both lungs were jello. Bullet exited leaving a hole about the size of a half dollar. Interlocks, I like em. Bob

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