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Campfire Kahuna
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Tiehm's buckwheat is said to grow only in 1 spot in NV, right near where a lithium mine is planned. The environmental crowd is ready to go to court over it. It's been proposed for the Endangered Species list but isn't on it at this time. Not that we need Li to power all these electric cars. I wonder if Chinese money is behind the lawsuits.

BUCKWHEAT


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The link doesn’t work for me.

Are the owners of the proposed lithium mine wholly American owned or is only a subsidiary American?


�Politicians are the lowest form of life on earth. Liberal Democrats are the lowest form of politician.� �General George S. Patton, Jr.

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Here's a cut & paste:

Groups to US: Protect Nevada flower from mine or face court
Conservationists say they're ready to take federal wildlife officials back to court in a three-year-long fight over endangered species protection for a rare wildflower in Nevada

By SCOTT SONNER - Associated Press Oct 28, 2022 Updated Oct 30, 2022

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Conservationists who won a court order against U.S. wildlife officials say they'll sue them again for failing to protect a Nevada wildflower whose last remaining habitat could be destroyed by a lithium mine.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a formal 60-day notice this week of its intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for missing this month's deadline to finalize its year-old proposal to add Tiehm’s buckwheat to the list of endangered species.

The service concluded in its Oct. 7, 2021, proposal that the desert wildflower — which is only known to exist where the mine is planned halfway between Reno and Las Vegas — was in danger of going extinct.

Under federal law, the agency had one year to issue a final rule listing the 6-inch-tall (15-centimeter-tall) flower with yellow blooms, or explain why it had decided against taking such action.

“Tiehm's buckwheat is staring down the barrel of extinction and it can't wait one more day for Endangered Species Act protection,” said Patrick Donnelly, the center's Great Basin director.

“The service is dragging its feet on protecting this rare wildflower and apparently needs the threat of legal action to do it's job," he said.

Agency officials refused to explain why they missed the deadline.

“We do not comment on litigation,” U.S. Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman Laury Marshall emailed to The Associated Press.

The center first petitioned the agency for a federal listing in 2019. It won a federal court order the following year forcing the agency to render an initial decision on whether there was enough scientific evidence to warrant a full review of the plant's status. The agency then proposed the endangered status, pending a year-long review.

“We find that Tiehm’s buckwheat is in danger of extinction throughout all of its range due to the severity and immediacy of threats currently impacting the species now and those which are likely to occur in the near term,” the agency said last October.

The primary threats are destruction, modification or curtailment of its habitat from mineral exploration and development, road development and other vehicle use, livestock grazing, invasive plant species and herbivory, the agency said. Climate change may further exacerbate the risks, and “existing regulatory mechanisms may be inadequate to protect the species,” it said.

The agency said then that fewer than 44,000 of the plants were known to exist, and the number likely was lower after thousands were destroyed in 2021 in what agency officials concluded was an unprecedented attack by rodents in the high desert near the California line.

Scott Lake, a lawyer for the center, said in the formal notice of intent to sue to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland and Fish and Wildlife Service Director Martha Williams on Tuesday that the “as-yet-unexplained collection/destruction events” have eliminated approximately 40% of the flower's population.

“Additional disturbances within the species’ habitat continued to occur through 2021 and 2022, underscoring the significant risk that this species faces to its survival,” Lake said.


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“Unprecedented attack by rodents”, and an “unexplained collection/destruction event” cutting 40% of the known population.

Translation: The plant species has always been subject to attack by native rodents in boom and bust cycles and they still don’t know much about the plant.

Seems like unmanaged grazing and invasive plant species would be the usual suspects. I gotta wonder if feral horses and burros are part of the problem.


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Shoot all the feral horses and chinese (not necessarily in that order).
Just ignore the tree huggers. (or shoot them too as they are just tools of the real enemy the chinese)

After all that decide you didn't need the lithium anyway...the world is now a better place....


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Originally Posted by Rock Chuck
Tiehm's buckwheat is said to grow only in 1 spot in NV, right near where a lithium mine is planned. The environmental crowd is ready to go to court over it. It's been proposed for the Endangered Species list but isn't on it at this time. Not that we need Li to power all these electric cars. I wonder if Chinese money is behind the lawsuits.

BUCKWHEAT
It's my understanding that in an effort to be fair, the U.S. taxpayers pay for all legal fees that any environmental group incurs during a lawsuit against the federal government. That is why you rarely hear of any of these eco greenie groups campaigning for money. They don't need it beyond normal day to day operations. WE PAY THE REST !

KWG


For liberals and anarchists, power and control is opium, selling envy is the fastest and easiest way to get it. TRR. American conservative. Never trust a white liberal. Malcom X Current NRA member.
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Harry Reid's heirs must not own the mineral rights just yet.....


I am MAGA.
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Originally Posted by AcesNeights
The link doesn’t work for me.

Are the owners of the proposed lithium mine wholly American owned or is only a subsidiary American?
I got no google foo...but the permit name is Cypress Development...but the big money for Cypress almost certainly comes from Albemarle which is US based, but is mining the hell out of Australia. The 'news' is not really news, Albemarle and previously Foote Minerals has been producing lithium carbonate there since the 1960's. I don't think there is anything sinister going on here, there is a lot of lithium there, the market is good, and recovery tech has improved and Albemarle is taking advantage of those factors. There is another big development in the works west of Orovada NV, Thacker Pass, the green whackos will find something there that needs saving. Luv2safari prolly shot all the chukkar there so that shouldn't be an issue.


Well this is a fine pickle we're in, should'a listened to Joe McCarthy and George Orwell I guess.
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Originally Posted by flintlocke
Originally Posted by AcesNeights
The link doesn’t work for me.

Are the owners of the proposed lithium mine wholly American owned or is only a subsidiary American?
I got no google foo...but the permit name is Cypress Development...but the big money for Cypress almost certainly comes from Albemarle which is US based, but is mining the hell out of Australia. The 'news' is not really news, Albemarle and previously Foote Minerals has been producing lithium carbonate there since the 1960's. I don't think there is anything sinister going on here, there is a lot of lithium there, the market is good, and recovery tech has improved and Albemarle is taking advantage of those factors. There is another big development in the works west of Orovada NV, Thacker Pass, the green whackos will find something there that needs saving. Luv2safari prolly shot all the chukkar there so that shouldn't be an issue.
Chukkars are an invasive species from the middle east. We don't want THAT, now do we? laugh


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My question about threatened and endangered species that are only found in one (or a few) locations is, how did they get that way? Was it because they were once plentiful and humans destroyed their habtat or hunted them to near extinction like American Bison, or was it because they're so poorly-adapted that they can only live in one or two places?

If it's the latter and they're occupying a valuable space like a lithium mine, by all means get some seeds, do some transplants in similar habitats, and try to keep them going. But just realize that their predicament is not man-made, and they're already on their way out because they couldn't adapt. So going to great lengths to preserve them, like declaring their habitat off-limits to essential human activities is a fool's errand unless they have some intrinsic value, as in medicine.

ANd realize that there are more extinct species in the fossil record than there are current species. Not a lot we can do about that.



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Originally Posted by Rock Chuck


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Originally Posted by smokepole
My question about threatened and endangered species that are only found in one (or a few) locations is, how did they get that way? Was it because they were once plentiful and humans destroyed their habtat or hunted them to near extinction like American Bison, or was it because they're so poorly-adapted that they can only live in one or two places?

If it's the latter and they're occupying a valuable space like a lithium mine, by all means get some seeds, do some transplants in similar habitats, and try to keep them going. But just realize that their predicament is not man-made, and they're already on their way out because they couldn't adapt. So going to great lengths to preserve them, like declaring their habitat off-limits to essential human activities is a fool's errand unless they have some intrinsic value, as in medicine.

ANd realize that there are more extinct species in the fossil record than there are current species. Not a lot we can do about that.
Of course I'm no biologist, but I have tramped, camped, prospected and explored the hell out of the Silver Peak Range, the geology, soil, weather and flora of that country is not varied. If you fell asleep in one part, woke up 50 miles away, you would be clueless. I am guessing that the Tiehm's Buckwheat is of so little interest that there has been no great effort to locate all the places it may be found. I would trust a Mexican cartel coyote before I trusted the enviro whackos.


Well this is a fine pickle we're in, should'a listened to Joe McCarthy and George Orwell I guess.
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Wait till they find a few sage grouse there, or some arrowheads.

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That’s ok the Chinese got it covered and they’ll respect nature and the environment no worries.

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Originally Posted by efw
That’s ok the Chinese got it covered and they’ll respect nature and the environment no worries.

What feels like forever ago, I worked as an environmental engineer at a large surface gold mine in NV. While there, we attempted to get the final bond release on a closed mine. It went out for public comment. One of the local envirowackos objected. His reasoning? What if an airplane was to crash into the old heap leach pile. Would that not possibly cause some contamination?

Those are the people the mining companies are dealing with.

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I can top that. I worked on a project for the Air Force, a "broken attow" project which is what they call an accident involving a nuclear warhead. A missile caught fire and burned, the warhead melted and they lost about 1.5 kilograms of plutonium that was washed out into a ditch by the firefighting water. We investigated the site and determined the best way to clean it up, which was to haul the contaminated soil, asphalt, and concrete to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. One of the comments we got on our report was that we didn't consider the cumulative effects of adding 1.5 kg of plutonium to the nuclear material already at the Nevada Test Site.

Which is where we've done most of the testing of our nuclear weapons.



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