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Joined: Aug 2003
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kwag Offline OP
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Has anybody ever tried to make their own stock for a Savage 10FP or any other rifle. I have access to CNC Machinery and CAD and I am thinking about taking this on as a Winter project. I am planning on making it out of Walnut, but making it a laminated Walnut stock. Any suggestions?

GB1

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I'm in the process of doing my first couple stocks from scratch, without a duplicator involved, the old fashioned way- with sharp tools and elbow grease.
While using machine tools may make the job easier, there is still a lot to learn to lay out the stock lines and action inletting.
Get a couple books on stock making and study them first, then have at it. My favorites are "Restocking a Rifle" by Alvin Linden, and "Professional Stockmaking" by Dave Westbrook. The Linden book has been out of print for quite awhile, but is available used on several sites on the internet. I found the best prices on Abebooks.com.

Just curious, why a laminated stock?- Sheister


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kwag Offline OP
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I guess I should have been more specific, a CNC Router to do the profile and a manual mill to do the inletting for the receiver and barrel. Why laminated, to control warping, along with shrinking and swelling. I also like the laminated look. I don't remember ever seeing a laminated walnut stock though, mostly birch. My first prototype will probably be out of poplar, until it is fine tuned. Thanks for the quick reply Sheister.

kwag

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You should seek out Sitka Deer on this one ...I have ssen some of his work. I know if I were going to take on a project of this magnitude that I would consult him.JMHO <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />


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I second what was said about Sitka Deer.

Just don't meet him in any dark alleys after midnight. <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

Seriously, he knows stockmaking!

Rick


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kwag
Welcome to the campfire! I have built a stock or two, have never used a duplicator or a pre-inletted blank of any kind, so I know nothing of how to set up that kind of machine work... I have made a few stocks for people to use for their duplicators though. CAD and CNC only help for multiples and only if you know what you want to build ahead of time.

For "one off" stocks like you would use for yourself I see little value in a duplicator. While it would be nice to build one stock and get it right for later dulication, what you will find is that there is no one perfect stock and different rifles will dictate different stock shapes, weights, grips, fore ends and cast.

The total beauty of starting from scratch is the fact you can build virtually anything from any piece of wood of adequate size. All the trouble you will go through setting up your machines will be wasted unless you build enough stocks of that shape on that action to justify the time.

Once you lock yourself into the shape and action, subtle changes will cost more than simply starting from scratch in the first place. Also, what escapes dupliacator users is the fact the final inletting and the final shaping are where the time is spent in building a stock. The time the duplicator saves is not the critical time, nor the hardest part.

I can see where building a stock from scratch can seem daunting, but starting with the measurements one wants to build to and getting the reference lines drawn is the only difficult part. The rest is just filing and checking for true; filing and keeping surfaces flat; filing and keeping the proper sequences flowing.

The idea of using laminated wood for a stock gives me the cold shivers. I do not like the look of it, at all and it will not accept checkering properly as the little pieces of wood cut off over the gluelines will not hold on the way solid wood does.

The little increase in stability created by laminating comes at great cost, in work, glue cost (sizeable) and weight in the finished product. Properly sealed solid wood stocks will not have stability problems, will weigh as little as you would like them to weigh and can look incredible.

Understanding what you are building ahead of time will help more than all the fancy machines. If you give us an idea what you are trying to have in the end there are a number of folks here that can give you a lot of help in deciding how to get there.

Dean, Rick,
THanks for the pats! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
art




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