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Joined: Aug 2002
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Karnis Offline OP
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I've one that needs some work-few dings and dents, although nothing real serious. It's a very nice piece of wood and was wondering if anyone out there knew of a smith that would be willing to take the project on. Need to freshen up the checkering as well.

Thanks.

GB1

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las Offline
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It is gonna cost if you have a 'smith do it. I'd charge you about $300 for the refinish and hand checker clean up- and I'm "retired"! Takes time, and time is money.

It isn't hard to do it yourself- True Oil and Linspeed work well as finishes for the common folk. It is what I use on mine. If you want a really hard finish, go to the archives and check out Sitka Deer's epoxy work.

You can get checkering kits from Brownell's (as well as refinish kits). Know what your checkering lines/inch are when you order. As a beginner, I'd advise you only work (slowly and carefully!)1/4 to 1/2 hour at a time on the checkering, resting your eyes and impatience at least 8 hours in between. Quit before you think you need to, and before you start making mistakes. Use a timer, or you will start making mistakes and over-runs. It takes intense concentration and good motor skills. Even experienced, I never do more than one panel at a time. An opti-visor helps (slight magnification). I hate checkering! Even cleanup. But neither refinishing nor the checkering stuff is that hard.

The last stock I built for myself, I left clean - no checkering. Haven't noticed it affects either looks or handling.

I usually use a chemical finish remover on the old finish, and a toothbrush in the checkering. Then I tape off the checkering before starting the new finish application. Once that is done, I clean up the checkering and apply several coats of finish to the checkering, again with a toothbrush, being carefull of overlap. This keeps the checkering sharp, without fill-in.

If the original finish isn't broken to where moisture can attack the wood, leave it alone. Minor dents and scratches are badges of honor.


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Campfire Kahuna
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las
I have "refreshed" many a stock, but have not used epoxy on a previously finished stock yet... don't relish the concept of trying anytime soon either! <img src="/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" /> I only use the epoxy on my new work.

I agree with the main of your statements, but I tend not to use a two-line for repointing a little checkering, just a jointer and a 60 degree single. I find I can feel what I am actually cutting better that way...

Depending on the vintage of the Remington it could be either an oil finish to build on or a plastic thing that requires either removal or just a good rubdown with rottenstone after spot repairs are done... spot repairs can be a pain with these though.
art


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Karnis,

You've heard from a couple of experts, and there's not much I can add. I have refinished some stocks having the hard "modern" finishes, and can certainly agree that it is a royal PITA. I can't blame any professional for not wanting to tackle the job, or charging several hundred dollars if they are willing to do it. I have stripped these finishes the hard way, with a strong finish remover and lots of elbow grease, meaning repeated coats of the remover followed by scraping with a razor blade and steel wool. Even then it is hard to get all the old finish out of the pores, and this must be done if most types of new finishes are to adhere properly. If you are commited to refinishing your stock, you can save time and trouble by having a professional furniture refinishing shop strip off the old finish. Even then, I had one local guy tell me that he would never do another. What I do these days is get most off it off myself, then turn it over to the pro to get the remainder off and out of the pores. You do have one advantage with the Remington Classic in that it doesn't have any plastic fittings to get eaten up by the chemical finish removers. Done properly, a refinished factory stock can really look nice, much better than the factory finish. My son has a Remington Classic and the factory finish really sucked, full of drips and lumps, kinda like pigskin. It now wears a McMillan. Good luck!

Paul


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