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Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Dillonbuck] #15703745 01/25/21
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copperking81 Offline
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Originally Posted by Dillonbuck
B.S.

If they had a fake cap, they would raise it just enough to sell
as much as possible while keeping prices high.

Increasing capacity is very expensive and requires machines,
trained people and supply.

What do you do when things slow.

Give the machines back to the bank and fire the people you hired and trained?


Static not fake. They can only produce so much with the equipment on hand.

Innovation solves a lot problems. Whining and excuses solve none and that's exactly why a company like Amazon becomes a Titan... because everyone else was to busy coming up with excuses for why something can't be done while they're finding solutions.



BP-B2

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: 79S] #15703774 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by 79S
I’m surprised hornady never got into selling primers as well..


I wonder whose primers they use in their ammunition line?


"Ignorance is acceptable, because you can remedy it with knowledge and research. Stupidity is when you guard your ignorance."
Ted Nugent

"Idolizing a politician is like believing the stripper really likes you."
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: copperking81] #15703841 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?


My ideal as a conservative:

That each person may reap as he/she has sown.
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15703968 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?



Hard problems get solved all the time. That's what propels us forward. Thankfully there are people among us who work around the excuses or won't settle for them.



Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: plainsman456] #15703977 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by plainsman456
I bet the price was around 80.00 or so.

Know a fellow that just came into a 300 Weatherby mag for a real good price.

He chocked when he saw the price for a box of 20.

As far as i know he still has not found any brass or dies to load with.

If not mistaken, it was close to $90


The desert is a true treasure for him who seeks refuge from men and the evil of men.
In it is contentment
In it is death and all you seek
(Quoted from "The Bleeding of the Stone" Ibrahim Al-Koni)

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IC-A

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: copperking81] #15703998 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Copperking81


Hard problems get solved all the time. That's what propels us forward. Thankfully there are people among us who work around the excuses or won't settle for them.

So, how much of your personal fortune are YOU willing to invest in this new ammunition factory?

Or, is someone else supposed to take all the risk, so that you do not become inconvenienced by a lack of ammunition?


My ideal as a conservative:

That each person may reap as he/she has sown.
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15704011 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?



honestly, who want's to work 7/12s for 1/2 the year at entry level wages?

or 72 hrs?

Even at $20/hr it's going to be hard to find someone who would rather have a job than a life.

We had similar issues where I retired from. Hard to get someone that would work hours like that, especially the job I had where one is gone for 4 days at a time, gets back for a few hours on the 4th day, then turns around for another 4 day trip at 0800 the next morning.


The desert is a true treasure for him who seeks refuge from men and the evil of men.
In it is contentment
In it is death and all you seek
(Quoted from "The Bleeding of the Stone" Ibrahim Al-Koni)

member of the cabal of dysfunctional squirrels?
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Jim_Conrad] #15704025 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Jim_Conrad
Originally Posted by Valsdad
Oh, I saw some 30-378 Weatherby on the shelves at Sportsman's the other day. I considered buying it even though I don't have anything chambered in that round, nor do I plan on it.

I didn't, I left it for perhaps some poor soul that needed it for his next dinosaur hunt.



There is a shop in town that asks what you are loading for before selling you powder.

Most of the new faces just want "powder"....dont care what it is.

Capitalists probably.


Have you gone in and said "everything I own " when asked what you're loading for...........................







Then asked for a can of Unique?


The desert is a true treasure for him who seeks refuge from men and the evil of men.
In it is contentment
In it is death and all you seek
(Quoted from "The Bleeding of the Stone" Ibrahim Al-Koni)

member of the cabal of dysfunctional squirrels?
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Valsdad] #15704140 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Valsdad
Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?



honestly, who want's to work 7/12s for 1/2 the year at entry level wages?

or 72 hrs?

Even at $20/hr it's going to be hard to find someone who would rather have a job than a life.

We had similar issues where I retired from. Hard to get someone that would work hours like that, especially the job I had where one is gone for 4 days at a time, gets back for a few hours on the 4th day, then turns around for another 4 day trip at 0800 the next morning.

You should hear the workers here scream when we talk about reducing overtime. Many of them are living paycheck to paycheck and depending on those 72 hour weeks. Quite a few would lose that shiny new pickup and/or their house.

A few of them have some brains. One foreman at about 30 years has his pension plus about $500K in his 401k. He is at about $27/hr now. He will be retired at 55 at the latest.


My ideal as a conservative:

That each person may reap as he/she has sown.
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15704151 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by Copperking81


Hard problems get solved all the time. That's what propels us forward. Thankfully there are people among us who work around the excuses or won't settle for them.

So, how much of your personal fortune are YOU willing to invest in this new ammunition factory?

Or, is someone else supposed to take all the risk, so that you do not become inconvenienced by a lack of ammunition?


I'd invest if the plan makes sense. Why would I not?

So what's your solution... sit around and belly ache about to much customer demand? lol



IC-B

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15704230 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Heck, I have been looking for H1000 for three years. I do not want to work up another load for the 7mm STW.


Sounds right. A while back I picked up 3 boxes of new RP STW brass planning a build. No 700s, no powder, no bullets on my shelf and few floating around. I considered a 6.5x.300 .. neck down and turn the necks .. but still, no powder. This time planning ahead bit me in the ass.

Tom


Anyone who thinks there's two sides to everything hasn't met a M�bius strip.

Here be dragons ...
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: copperking81] #15704242 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by Copperking81


Hard problems get solved all the time. That's what propels us forward. Thankfully there are people among us who work around the excuses or won't settle for them.

So, how much of your personal fortune are YOU willing to invest in this new ammunition factory?

Or, is someone else supposed to take all the risk, so that you do not become inconvenienced by a lack of ammunition?


I'd invest if the plan makes sense. Why would I not?

So what's your solution... sit around and belly ache about to much customer demand? lol


Not at all. I am tickled to death that folks' interest in guns and ammo is high. I am not bellyaching at all.

If I run low on components, I will pull something else out of the safe. I will restock when the crazy is over. But I really doubt I could run out of anything in twenty years. I always buy in bulk when prices are low.


My ideal as a conservative:

That each person may reap as he/she has sown.
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Valsdad] #15704245 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Valsdad
Originally Posted by Jim_Conrad
Originally Posted by Valsdad
Oh, I saw some 30-378 Weatherby on the shelves at Sportsman's the other day. I considered buying it even though I don't have anything chambered in that round, nor do I plan on it.

I didn't, I left it for perhaps some poor soul that needed it for his next dinosaur hunt.



There is a shop in town that asks what you are loading for before selling you powder.

Most of the new faces just want "powder"....dont care what it is.

Capitalists probably.


Have you gone in and said "everything I own " when asked what you're loading for...........................







Then asked for a can of Unique?


I do use a lot of Unique!

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15705006 01/25/21
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Valsdad Offline
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by Valsdad
Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?



honestly, who want's to work 7/12s for 1/2 the year at entry level wages?

or 72 hrs?

Even at $20/hr it's going to be hard to find someone who would rather have a job than a life.

We had similar issues where I retired from. Hard to get someone that would work hours like that, especially the job I had where one is gone for 4 days at a time, gets back for a few hours on the 4th day, then turns around for another 4 day trip at 0800 the next morning.

You should hear the workers here scream when we talk about reducing overtime. Many of them are living paycheck to paycheck and depending on those 72 hour weeks. Quite a few would lose that shiny new pickup and/or their house.

A few of them have some brains. One foreman at about 30 years has his pension plus about $500K in his 401k. He is at about $27/hr now. He will be retired at 55 at the latest.



Smart guy. I wish I had started the same routine when younger.


The desert is a true treasure for him who seeks refuge from men and the evil of men.
In it is contentment
In it is death and all you seek
(Quoted from "The Bleeding of the Stone" Ibrahim Al-Koni)

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Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Idaho_Shooter] #15705064 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Idaho_Shooter
Originally Posted by copperking81
Originally Posted by eblake
Guns America Digest has a recent interview with Jason Hornady about their current production efforts and his expectations for ammo sales. It's interesting reading and may alleviate some fears about longer term ammo and component supplies. He confirms that much (most) of the current situation is the result of panic buying.


Panic buying is not the cause of the ammunition shortage. The ammo market has long shown a pattern of rapid and extreme peaks in demand over ~15 years, so that's a BS excuse.

We have an ammunition shortage because the companies in the industry have placed a static cap on their capacity and are reluctant to scale to meet periods of rapid increase in demand. That won't change until an innovative competitor enters the market and disrupts the status quo.




Is the factory running at 100% capacity?

How would you have them increase beyond 100%

Trained people do not grow on trees. At $20/hr, you can not even hire trainable people.

The factory I work is relevant. 52 weeks/year at 40 hrs/week equals 2080 hours per year.

Many of our employees worked over 3000 hours last year, some came very close to 3500 hrs.

Our schedule is 4/10 hour shifts per week. But the crews typically work 5/12s for 12 weeks, 6/12s for 16 weeks, and 7/12s for 24 weeks.

With two crews this allows us to run 24 hrs for five, six, or seven days per week. Yes, this is a huge amount of overtime pay, with double time for any Sunday worked. But as benefits cost about half as much as and on top of wages, it is a wash between overtime or adding employees.

The bottom line is: we can barely find enough competent new hires to replace those who retire or quit. There has been much discussion about putting on an additional shift and doing a 5/8 schedule so 7 days would only make 56 hour weeks instead of 84 hours.

But we simply can not find the people to fill out the crews. Every time we need two, we bring in six or eight then fire all but one in the first two weeks for dirty piss test, tardiness, or just simple laziness.

Now these are simple entry level jobs. But the guys who do work them sure do drive some expensive rigs.

So, back to the ammo factory. I doubt they can find people to put on additional shifts. If they are already running 24/7, they can not do much better than that.

Perhaps the shareholders would like to pay for a nice new factory and gamble they could sell enough product to pay for the factory before the craziness ends and they have to close the doors?



This happens in the steel industry all the time. A steel company sees that a lot of steel is going into a particular industry and their current mill is running at full capacity. They then build a new mill. When the new mill is up and going the market has slowed down and they are running both mills less than 50% and they lay half of the workers off. Its great to have excess capacity when the market is picking up and you can sell more product. It sucks to have excess capacity when no one is buying your product and you are in a cyclical market. You can only tell your workers for so long to wait until the next election cycle and it will get better.

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Valsdad] #15705092 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Valsdad

I loves me some Kalamata olives.

I love them on pizza, along with roasted red peppers. I also use them in my Pesce Livornese recipe, along with capers.


"Our prayers are with the family of George Floyd, and our prayers are also with the family of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. We have no tolerance for racism in America. We have no tolerance for violence inspired by racism."

- Mike Pence
Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: The_Real_Hawkeye] #15705276 01/25/21
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No capers tonight, but we had a simple dinner of Costco noodles with some jar spaghetti sauce over it, The wife doctored up the sauce with some red peppers she roasted in the oven last night for our bluefin dinner. I suggested some Kalamatas too, which really made it better.


The desert is a true treasure for him who seeks refuge from men and the evil of men.
In it is contentment
In it is death and all you seek
(Quoted from "The Bleeding of the Stone" Ibrahim Al-Koni)

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Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Jim_Conrad] #15705446 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Jim_Conrad


I do use a lot of Unique!




Do you know how you catch a Unique bird?














































Unique up on him Dummy!


Paul

"I'd rather see a sermon than hear a sermon".... D.A.D.

"Because I'm President and they're not".... DJT

Joe and the Ho 2020!

molɔ̀ːn labé skýla

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: eblake] #15705475 01/25/21
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Hahahahahaha!

Re: Interview with Jason Hornady [Re: Cheesy] #15705577 01/25/21
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Originally Posted by Cheesy
Originally Posted by websterparish47
Seems there is a hole in the distribution system where product is disappearing and no one seems too concerned to find where that hole is.


There is no hole.

Everybody that formerly had 1,000 primers on hand now wants 2,000 or 5,000.

Everybody that formerly had a box of .30-30s now wants 3 boxes or 5.

Everybody that had 3 boxes of cheap dove loads now wants 6 or 10 boxes.

Everybody that had 10 Flats of AAs it STSs for target shoots now wants 20 or 40 flats.

Everybody that had a box of .22s, now wants 5 boxes.

Everybody that had 1,000 .22s now wants 10,0000.

Everybody that had 3 lbs of powder, now wants 10 lbs.

If anybody sees something on the shelf that kinda might work but isn’t their ideal solution, they’re buying it anyway, either to use regrettingly, or to use as trade bait or to flip.

The stuff hits the shelves and sells immediately, rather than sitting for weeks.


This, I believe.


The only true cost of having a dog is its death.
"It would have been a good distance shot if they hadn't been so far away". Seth Kantner in "Shopping for Porcupine"
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