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Picking up a new to me Rem 700 416 Rem mag. Sits in a HS precision stock and matte finish . Gun has a removable brake and a threaded cap as well. I’ve already picked up a Leupold VX3 1.5-5 illuminated 30mm tube for it. I’m taking it to get drilled and tapped for sights. Having him price out a set of after
Market sights with the wrap around front sight but also thinking just a factory set with a hood Would works as well. I’m thinking some kind of QD rings and bases. Leaning toward Talleys. Sound like a plan or should I stick with something else? Also should I get the scope base holes redrilled and tapped 8/40 for strength? Also like to hear thoughts on having an M16 extractor installed.




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Several comments:

Talley QD steel rings and bases are as strong as anything I've experienced for the purpose. Wouldn't bother with getting the holes redrilled and tapped, as in reality 8-40s aren't any stronger, because of the deeper threads. It makes more difference to attach the bases/screws with something to "enhance" the connection, whether thread-locker (which also helps bases stay put) or epoxy.

Would also buy another scope for backup--in the same kind of rings. Have seen more scopes "die" in Africa than anywhere else, mostly because the cartridges chosen for hunting over there tend to kick hard enough to break scopes-especially "buffalo" rifles. Have seen this several times since I went on my my first safari around 30 years ago--including on the rifle I used then.

The Remington extractor works fine--as long as its kept reasonably clean, which isn't exclusive to any type of extractor. If it's going to break, it already would have. (Ross Seyfried used a Remington 700 .416 Rem. Magnum as his back-up rifle when guiding in Tanzania--I suspect partly because, knowing Ross, he wanted to run contrary to standard "wisdom.")

Have not found a hooded front sight all that useful in Africa (or elsewhere). If it's needed as "backup," the hood results in less light on the front sight--and that doesn't help in dimmer light--which is common in buffalo hunting. Also, the standard Remington front sight isn't very tough. Which is why I prefer a stouter front sight, without a hood.


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"knowing Ross, he wanted to run contrary to standard "wisdon"

Sorry for the drift, but LOL when I read this. When I used to read Ross a lot I often referred to him as the Myth Buster.


But, for sights, both front & rear, NECG is worth a look IMO. Lots of great options of DGR's.

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Originally Posted by RTSJ
Picking up a new to me Rem 700 416 Rem mag. Sits in a HS precision stock and matte finish . Gun has a removable brake and a threaded cap as well. I’ve already picked up a Leupold VX3 1.5-5 illuminated 30mm tube for it. I’m taking it to get drilled and tapped for sights. Having him price out a set of after
Market sights with the wrap around front sight but also thinking just a factory set with a hood Would works as well. I’m thinking some kind of QD rings and bases. Leaning toward Talleys. Sound like a plan or should I stick with something else? Also should I get the scope base holes redrilled and tapped 8/40 for strength? Also like to hear thoughts on having an M16 extractor installed.




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Roy


Roy, I’ve been using Leupold QD base/rings for many years. My rifle produces 59+ ft/lbs. recoil, which is probably similar to your 416. They have never been a problem. I have a back-up scope already zero’d as well as iron sights. I wouldn’t think twice about going the same route again!

We (wife and I) drilled and tapped both of our rifles for larger screws. I think that they offer greater shear-strength….but also apply blue Lock Tite to all screws, base to receiver contact, as well as in the scope saddles! I can’t swear that they are necessary…..but, it darn sure can’t hurt! memtb

Last edited by memtb; 03/31/23.

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Appreciate the info fellas. If anyone got an extra set of extended bases and 30mm and 1” lows let me know before I order. I have a layup Vari-x iii 2.5-8 I’ll mount up in another set of rings as a back up.


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memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....

Which is one reason I have sometimes epoxied bases to the actions of harder-recoiling rifles, which provides far more help in keeping the bases in place than either 6-48 or 8-40 screws. But eventually I tended to prefer actions with integral scope-mount bases, such as the CZ 550 and Rugers.


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Originally Posted by Mule Deer
memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....

Which is one reason I have sometimes epoxied bases to the actions of harder-recoiling rifles, which provides far more help in keeping the bases in place than either 6-48 or 8-40 screws. But eventually I tended to prefer actions with integral scope-mount bases, such as the CZ 550 and Rugers.

Thanks…..I wasn’t aware! 🤔 I would’a never thunk it! 😁 memtb


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Yeah, I didn't either for a long time, until an engineer friend explained it to me! It's one of the interesting little details that make rifles so interesting....


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Originally Posted by Mule Deer
Yeah, I didn't either for a long time, until an engineer friend explained it to me! It's one of the interesting little details that make rifles so interesting....


Good info presented in your posts above John, thanks.


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Originally Posted by Mule Deer
memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....
Um... NO!
In a properly designed system the shear stress on a screw is placed on the SHANK of the screw, not the threaded portion. While the thread MINOR DIAMETERS of the screws threads you've mentioned are almost the same size they're not exposed to shear stress. They are under tension. A #8 screw has aprox 30% MORE shear strength than a #6 cap screw. An engineer worth his salt knows this though it doesn't surprise me...
Falls under the "you can bullsh!t the fans but ya ain't gonna bullschidt the players". 😉

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Originally Posted by AJ300MAG
Originally Posted by Mule Deer
memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....
Um... NO!
In a properly designed system the shear stress on a screw is placed on the SHANK of the screw, not the threaded portion. While the thread MINOR DIAMETERS of the screws threads you've mentioned are almost the same size they're not exposed to shear stress. They are under tension. A #8 screw has aprox 30% MORE shear strength than a #6 cap screw. An engineer worth his salt knows this though it doesn't surprise me...
Falls under the "you can bullsh!t the fans but ya ain't gonna bullschidt the players". 😉

That's interesting, and thanks for the info. But the main point is that either kind of small screw is the weak point in scope-base mounting, and 30% more shear strength isn't all that much. I have seen both "fail" to hold scope bases tightly on a hard-kicking rifle--if something else isn't used to keep the bases in place, whether some form of Loc-Tite between the bases and top of the action, or epoxy. Which is why I eventually came to prefer integral bases.

Have also heard more than one person describe any gathering of engineers as "an argument."


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Originally Posted by AJ300MAG
Originally Posted by Mule Deer
memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....
Um... NO!
In a properly designed system the shear stress on a screw is placed on the SHANK of the screw, not the threaded portion. While the thread MINOR DIAMETERS of the screws threads you've mentioned are almost the same size they're not exposed to shear stress. They are under tension. A #8 screw has aprox 30% MORE shear strength than a #6 cap screw. An engineer worth his salt knows this though it doesn't surprise me...
Falls under the "you can bullsh!t the fans but ya ain't gonna bullschidt the players". 😉

There is basically no unthreaded portion of a #8 scope base screw to produce a shank. Treaded to the head, stress risers all the way. Forget changing the action for future fitments by changing to #8 holes.
If additional mount strength is required, simply drill & ream for a 1/8" or 5/32" dowel pin. Just behind the rear screw hole in the front base on a Rem 700 SA is a generous area about a half inch long & .300" thick. A perfect place to add mounting strength without changing the action for future mounting applications.
I have additional hints on the process, but utill on board the dowel pin vs. bigger screw concept, those suggestioins are mute.

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MHO regarding iron sights, my M70 wears Talleys and has irons. While my experience is not vast consisting of a grand total of 3 follow ups on wounded buffalo I have never used the irons since a 1.5 power scope is faster and better in every respect at least for me. YMMV.


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Originally Posted by gunzo
Originally Posted by AJ300MAG
Originally Posted by Mule Deer
memtb,

The "problem" with larger 8-40 screws is their larger threads than on 6-48 screws. The larger threads result in the "unthreaded" portion of the body of the screw (which is what might shear) being just about exactly the same diameter as on finer-threaded 6-48s. But if they make you feel more confident....
Um... NO!
In a properly designed system the shear stress on a screw is placed on the SHANK of the screw, not the threaded portion. While the thread MINOR DIAMETERS of the screws threads you've mentioned are almost the same size they're not exposed to shear stress. They are under tension. A #8 screw has aprox 30% MORE shear strength than a #6 cap screw. An engineer worth his salt knows this though it doesn't surprise me...
Falls under the "you can bullsh!t the fans but ya ain't gonna bullschidt the players". 😉

There is basically no unthreaded portion of a #8 scope base screw to produce a shank. Treaded to the head, stress risers all the way. Forget changing the action for future fitments by
changing to #8 holes.
If additional mount strength is required, simply drill & ream for a 1/8" or 5/32" dowel pin. Just behind the rear screw hole in the front base on a Rem 700 SA is a generous area about a half inch long & .300" thick. A perfect place to add mounting strength without changing the action for future mounting applications.
I have additional hints on the process, but utill on board the dowel pin vs. bigger screw concept, those suggestioins are mute.
Ever run a threading machine?
We had a piece of tooling that worked by the same concept except it was mounted to a lathe tailstock. You take an #8-32 screw, cut the threaded portion off and stick the head into a lathe collet. The tooling head has a pair of 40tpi roll form threading dies installed in it. Turn on the lathe, slide the tailstock up to the shank unitl the die feeds onto the part. There's an adjustable stop inside the die housing that when the end of the part contacts it the dies snap open and you slide the tailstock back out of the way. It's fairly easy to leave ⅛" or what ever you desire of unthreaded shank on the screw.


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